Izinganekwane

Couverture
J.A. Blair, 1868 - 375 pages
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Page 209 - If by your art, my dearest father, you have Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them : The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch, But that the sea, mounting to the welkin's cheek, Dashes the fire out.
Page 287 - No distance breaks the tie of blood : Brothers are brothers evermore ; Nor wrong, nor wrath of deadliest mood, That magic may o'erpower ; Oft, ere the common source be known, The kindred drops will claim their own, And throbbing pulses silently Move heart towards heart by sympathy. So is it with true Christian hearts ; Their mutual share in Jesus...
Page 50 - So on the floor lay Balder dead ; and round Lay thickly strewn swords, axes, darts, and spears, Which all the Gods in sport had idly thrown At Balder, whom no weapon pierced or clove ; But in his breast stood fixt the fatal bough Of mistletoe, which Lok the Accuser gave To Hoder, and unwitting Hoder threw — 'Gainst that alone had Balder's life no charm.
Page 15 - She put the pot on the fire, and plenty of turf under it, and set the water boiling at such a rate, that if ever water was red-hot, it surely was. The child was lying, for a wonder, quite easy and quiet in the cradle, every now and then cocking his eye, that would twinkle as keen as a star in a frosty night, over at the great fire, and the big pot upon it ; and he looked on with great attention at Mrs. Sullivan breaking the eggs and putting down the egg-shells to boil. At last he asked, with the"...
Page 193 - So our Lord gave him three wishes. " Well," said the Smith, " first and foremost, I wish that any one whom I ask to climb up into the pear-tree that stands outside by the wall of my forge, may stay sitting there till I ask him to come down again. The second wish I wish is, that any one whom I ask to sit down in my easy chair which stands inside the workshop yonder, may stay sitting there till I ask him to get up. Last of all, I wish that any one whom I ask to creep into the steel purse which I have...
Page 33 - The lion, too lazy to work, left it to the hare to do ; and the wily runner took the lion's tail, and interwove it so cleverly into the stakes and reeds of the hut, that it remained there confined for ever, and the hare had the pleasure of seeing his rival die of hunger and rage. Then he stripped off his skin and disguised himself in it.
Page 74 - When it got to the place where the sun was snared, its back began to smoke and burn, with the intensity of the heat, and the top of its carcass was reduced to enormous heaps of ashes. It succeeded, however, in cutting the cord with its teeth, and freeing the sun, but it was reduced to a very small...
Page 182 - And they did so. All kind of food was collected, and bread made ; and they took the handles of digging-picks : they took these that they might fasten them on behind. It was then that they turned into baboons. We do not know any long account of what they did that they might turn into baboons, but only that they thus fastened on the pick-handles ; they grew and became tails ; hair made its appearance on their bodies; their foreheads became overhanging, and so they became baboons. They went to the precipices...
Page 39 - She fetched him meat and drink plenty, Like a true wedded wife; And pleased him with that she had, Whom she loved as her life. There lay an old wife in that place, A little beside the fire, Which William had found of charity More than seven year. Up she rose, and...
Page 75 - The dreadfull fish, that hath deserv'd the name Of Death, and like him lookes in dreadfull hew; The griesly wasserman, that makes his game The flying ships with...