J. M. Coetzee

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Cambridge University Press, 1997 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 192 pages
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The importance of J. M. Coetzee in the development of twentieth-century fiction is widely recognised. His work addresses some of the key issues of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries: the relationship between postmodernism and postcolonialism, the role of history in the novel, and the question of how the author can combine an ethical and political consciousness with a commitment to the novel as a work of fiction. In this study, written in 1998, Dominic Head assesses Coetzee's position as a white South African writer engaged with the legacy of colonialism. Through close readings of all the novels, Head shows how Coetzee inhabits a transitional site between Europe and Africa, and it is from this position that his more general concerns emerge. Coetzee's engagement with the problems facing the postcolonial writer, Head argues, is always enriched by his awareness of a wider literary tradition.
 

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Contents

Coetzee and postcolonial literature
1
Dusklands
28
In the Heart of the Country
49
Waiting for the Barbarians
72
Life and Times of Michael K
93
Foe
112
Age of Iron
129
The Master of Petersburg
144
Notes
163
Select bibliography
179
Index
191
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