Jack London and Hawaii

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Mills & Boon, 1918 - Authors, American - 305 pages
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Page 104 - FORTH from her land to mine she goes, The island maid, the island rose, Light of heart and bright of face : The daughter of a double race. Her islands here, in Southern sun, Shall mourn their Kaiulani gone, And I, in her dear banyan shade, Look vainly for my little maid. But our Scots islands far away Shall glitter with unwonted day, And cast for once their tempests by To smile in Kaiulani's eye.
Page 104 - M her look at this page; it will be like a weed gathered and pressed at home; and she will remember her own islands, and the shadow of the mighty tree; and she will hear the peacocks screaming in the dusk and the wind blowing in the palms; and she will think of her father sitting there alone...
Page 238 - And it's twenty thousand mile to our little lazy isle Where the trumpet-orchids blow! You have heard the call of the off-shore wind And the voice of the deep-sea rain ; You have heard the song — how long — how long? Pull out on the trail again! The Lord knows what we may find, dear lass, And the Deuce knows what we may do — But we're back once more on the old trail, our own trail, the out trail, We're down, hull down, on the Long Trail — the trail that is always new!
Page vi - He knows the sky who knows the sod, And he who loves a flower loves God". Sky, flower and sod, he loved them all. From all he wrote (not for his day) A sense of marvel drifts to me — Of morning on a purple sea, And fragrant islands far away. George Sterling.
Page 229 - Averick" a month before her passing; and the crowning triumph of her dying hours was the first complete copy of the New Testament in the Hawaiian tongue. Alexander writes : — "... Her place could not be filled, and the events of the next few years (of reaction, uncertainty, and disorder in internal affairs) showed the greatness of the loss which the nation had sustained. The ' days of Kaahumanu ' were long remembered as days of progress and prosperity.
Page 219 - VOLCANO HOME, HAWAII, Saturday, September 7, 1907. Away back in 1790 or thereabout, an American furtrader named Metcalf, commanding the snow Eleanor, visited the Sandwich Islands on his way to the Orient, his son, eighteen years of age, being master of a small schooner, Fair American, which had been detained by the Spaniards at Nootka Sound. A plot was hatched by some of the chiefs to capture the Eleanor, and was frustrated by Kamehameha, who himself boarded her and ordered the treacherous chiefs...
Page 104 - WRITTEN in April to Kaiulani in the April of her age; and at Waikiki, within easy walk of Kaiulani's banyan! When she comes to my land and her father's, and the rain beats upon the window (as I fear it will), let her look at this page; it will be like a weed gathered and pressed at home; and she will remember her own islands, and the shadow of the mighty tree; and she will hear the peacocks screaming in the dusk and the wind blowing in the palms; and she will think of her father sitting there alone.
Page 131 - When the Snark sailed along the windward coast of Molokai, on her way to Honolulu, I looked at the chart, then pointed to a low-lying peninsula backed by a tremendous cliff varying from two to four thousand feet in height, and said: "The pit of hell, the most cursed place on earth." I should have been shocked, if, at that moment, I could have caught a vision of myself a month later, ashore in the most cursed place on earth...
Page 185 - On the same tahua or floor they also play at another game, resembling the pahe, which they call maita or uru maita. Two sticks are stuck in the ground only a few inches apart, at a distance of thirty or forty yards, and between these, but without striking either, the parties at play strive to throw their stone ; at other times, the only contention is, who can bowl it farthest along
Page 254 - ... surpasses most because the house is as good as the garden, and both express the tropics. The house has wide lanais, supported by high white columns, something in the Southern colonial style, and is simple and dignified. Around it are great trees that shut away the street, that keep the house always cool. The whole has an air of retirement expressive of the attitude of the Queen herself.

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