Jack O' Judgment

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The Floating Press, Nov 1, 2012 - Fiction - 325 pages
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Pining for a gripping tale from the classic early years of detective fiction? Dip into Jack O' Judgment by Edgar Wallace. Though his intentions might be pure, brutally violent vigilante Jack is bent on revenge -- and he'll do whatever it takes to exact his retribution against the criminal kingpin known as Dan Boundary. This mystery is packed with plenty of action and adventure.
 

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Contents

Chapter I The Knave of Clubs
5
Chapter II Jack O JudgmentHis Card
13
Chapter III The Decoy
26
Chapter IV The Missing Hanson
32
Chapter V In the Magistrates Court
41
Chapter VI Stafford King Resigns
50
Chapter VII The Colonel Conducts His Business
59
Chapter VIII The Listener at the Door
67
Chapter XXI The Bride of Death
157
Chapter XXII Maisie Tells Her Story
161
Chapter XXIII The Gang Fund
172
Chapter XXIV Pinto Goes North
180
Chapter XXV A Patron of Charity
191
Chapter XXVI The Soldier Who Followed
200
Chapter XXVII The Capture of Jack
207
Chapter XXVIII The Passing of Phillopolis
217

Chapter IX The Colonel Employs a Detective
76
Chapter X The Greek Phillopolis
84
Chapter XI The Colonel at Scotland Yard
90
Chapter XII Buying a Nursing Home
102
Chapter XIII The Love of Stafford King
108
Chapter XIV The Taking of Maisie White
113
Chapter XV The Commissioner Has a Theory
118
Chapter XVI In the Turkish Baths
124
Chapter XVII Solomon Comes Back
129
Chapter XVIII The Judgment of Death
136
Chapter XIX The Colonel is Shocked
142
Chapter XX Swell Crewe Backs Out
152
Chapter XXIX The Voice in the Room
228
Chapter XXX Diamonds for the Bank
239
Chapter XXXI The Voice Again
249
Chapter XXXII Lollie Goes Away
257
Chapter XXXIII Where the Voice Lived
263
Chapter XXXIV Conscience Money
269
Chapter XXXV In a Box at the Orpheum
278
Chapter XXXVI Lollie Proposes
288
Chapter XXXVII The Fall of Pinto
294
Chapter XXXVIII A Use for Old Films
301
Chapter XXXIX Jack O Judgment Revealed
314
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About the author (2012)

Among the most prolific of all authors of adventure fiction was the redoubtable Edgar Wallace. Born in London, Wallace received his early education at St. Peter's School and the Board School. Wallace served in the Royal West Kent Regiment in England and later as part of the Medical Staff Corps stationed in South Africa. During World War I, Wallace acted as a special interrogator for the War Office. As was the case with a number of successful popular authors, Wallace experienced a rich and diverse life before turning to professional writing. From 1886 to the 1930s, he worked in a printing shop, a shoe shop, and a rubber factory, and served as a merchant sailor and milk deliverer. Beginning in 1899, Wallace became a journalist and wrote variously for the London Daily Mail and the Rand Daily News, among others; he also worked with the racing periodicals, having founded two of them---Bibury's Weekly and R. E. Walton's Weekly. Like Sax Rohmer, Wallace earned a fortune from his writings, yet, because of a lack of business sense and a tendency to overspend, he died in debt. A prodigious writer of fiction, Wallace published, over the course of his professional life, some 173 books and wrote 17 plays. Many of his adventure narratives featured elements of crime or mystery, but they all thrived on action. Although Wallace's handling of plot was superb and he was respected for his ability to blend suspense with humor, he was less successful with his characters, who tended to be two-dimensional and stereotyped. One of his early crime adventures, The Four Just Men (1906), introduced what was to become a trademark for Wallace---lurid sensationalism coupled with dramatic violence. Wallace published in a wide range of genres, including poetry, short fiction, autobiography, and epic political history. Regrettably, much of what he wrote has lapsed into obscurity today. As sometimes is the problem with popular fiction, perhaps it was too hurriedly written---too intimately connected with its contemporary audience---to stand the ultimate test of time. But Wallace's work was highly influential, especially in the American pulp magazine markets of the Great Depression, and stands today, despite its many flaws, as some of the most effective literary adventures ever written.

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