Jackpot Frequency Playbook: Bet the Numbers That Smash the Odds and Hit the Rollovers

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eBookIt.com, Feb 1, 2013 - Games - 70 pages
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Many lottery players fathom their own tickets, but the fact remains 70% of all jackpot winners quick pick the elusive 6! Weekly draws generate on average 92 rollovers with 10 winners a year, but when you study the decades of bi-weekly draws there's a subtle frequency that links positions as mostly five and six ball matches. The Jackpot Frequency Playbook enables both novice and serious gamer to discover the ambiguity of play pools, extract all the winning numbers, reconfigure every 6 of 6 and 5 + 1 or 2 match possibility and once all the dots begin to connect, the game rules change, the win attitude shifts, the pools multiple, and the odds reduce to the right side of possible. If you bet the lottery as six choices from one or two pools there's every chance you could match a jackpot once in a lifetime, but if you bet six balls as six pools there's an even greater possibility you will match it twice a year! The Jackpot Frequency Playbook exploits position frequencies from seven of the most popular and challenging lotteries on the planet and explains how, where and when the 5 and 6 and 7 numbers link often consecutively, sometimes monthly, every game played, each year drawn. Nothing compares as this aligned frequency propelled with ecstatic efficiency quadruples the probability of matching multiple wins and becomes the tool for interpreting the otherwise unfathomable ways of pick 6 jackpots.
The Jackpot Frequency Playbook is like nothing else before!
 

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About the author (2013)

Jaq Roth, a problemist thinker inspired by undecipherable puzzles, combinational perplexities and the laws of nature. A resourceful artist and published author coached by uncommon sense and an inherited fascination for how things work, understands that when experts say something is impossible, a new way evolves and whether it's an improvement on an old idea, or a totally new approach the outcome always creates the most exciting results, because when it comes to numbers there's always something more to learn.

A scholar with a working knowledge of twenty-six languages, Nicholas Ostler has degrees from Oxford University in Greek, Latin, philosophy, and economics, and a Ph.D. in linguistics from MIT, where he studied under Noam Chomsky. He lives in Bath, England.

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