Jacob's Ladder

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The Porcupine's Quill, 1997 - Fiction - 191 pages
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A romantic comedy written with the authenticity of a memoir, Jacob's Ladder is entertaining and intelligent. Full of wit, slapstick and heart, it conjures up the great screwball comedies of the 1940s. Joel Yanofsky writes about a community he knows intimately -- anglophone Montréal -- a community which has, over the years, both changed dramatically and dramatically resisted change.

The same is true of Yanofsky's narrator, Jacob Glassman, a thirtysomething Oliver Twist stuck in the suburban home he grew up in and clinging to the status quo for dear life. Not easy to do for a man who is pursuing two women at the same time and who is caught up in a shifting series of love triangles. When it comes to craziness, Jacob points out, there's an awfully wide margin for error. In Jacob's Ladder, that margin is stretched to the limit by a cast of hilarious, haywire characters: rogue real estate agents, sentimental adulterers, an obese shrink, an agoraphobic travel agent, a transsexual newspaper editor, and a proselytzing rabbinical student with his sights set on Jacob's bewildered soul.

 

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Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
7
Section 3
10
Section 4
16
Section 5
24
Section 6
41
Section 7
42
Section 8
45
Section 21
110
Section 22
116
Section 23
118
Section 24
121
Section 25
122
Section 26
128
Section 27
131
Section 28
137

Section 9
48
Section 10
55
Section 11
58
Section 12
70
Section 13
72
Section 14
75
Section 15
81
Section 16
82
Section 17
91
Section 18
93
Section 19
99
Section 20
102
Section 29
139
Section 30
141
Section 31
147
Section 32
150
Section 33
151
Section 34
158
Section 35
168
Section 36
174
Section 37
182
Section 38
184
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Joel Yanofsky's first collection of stories, Homo Erectus ... And Other Popular Tales of True Romance was published by Nuage Editions in 1996. He teaches journalism at Concordia University. Yanofsky's reviews and articles have appeared in The Village Voice, Canadian Geographic, Chatelaine, The Globe and Mail, The Toronto Star and The Montreal Gazette, among others.

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