Jacob's Room

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Penguin Books Limited, 1992 - Fiction - 191 pages
11 Reviews
Jacob Flanders is a young man passing from adolescence to adulthood in a hazy rite of passage. From his boyhood on the windswept shores of Cornwall to his days as a student at Cambridge, his elusive, chameleon-like character is gradually revealed in a stream of loosely related incidents and impressions: whether through his mother’s letters, his friend’s conversations, or the thoughts of the women who adore him. Then we glimpse him as a young man, caught under the glare of a London streetlamp. It is 1914, he is twenty-six, and Europe is on the brink of war ... This tantalizing novel heralded Woolf’s bold departure from the traditional methods of the novel, with its experimental play between time and reality, memory and desire.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

I suspect that I chose the wrong Virginia Woolf book for my first read. Jacob’s Room was beautifully written, full of descriptive passages, original in both outlook and style but for most of the book ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

This short novel was my first experience of Virginia Woolf's writings. It is quickly read and not difficult at all to enjoy, like a walk through a park on a sunny day with interesting companions and ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is now recognized as a major twentieth-century author, a great novelist and essayist and a key figure in literary history as a feminist and a modernist. Her first novel, The Voyage Out, appeared in 1915, and she then worked through the transitional Night and Day (1919) to the highly experimental and impressionistic Jacob's Room (1922). Her major novels include Mrs Dalloway (1925), Orlando (1928), The Waves (1931), The Years (1937), and Between the Acts (1941).

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