Jacob's Room

Front Cover
Penguin, Feb 7, 2006 - Fiction - 224 pages
10 Reviews
Based on the life of her brother, this unforgettable book chronicles the life and times of Jacob Flanders-and remains an important work in the development of the novel form, and a shining example of Woolf's genius and literary daring.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DeltaQueen50 - LibraryThing

I suspect that I chose the wrong Virginia Woolf book for my first read. Jacob’s Room was beautifully written, full of descriptive passages, original in both outlook and style but for most of the book ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - P_S_Patrick - LibraryThing

This short novel was my first experience of Virginia Woolf's writings. It is quickly read and not difficult at all to enjoy, like a walk through a park on a sunny day with interesting companions and ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Chapter One
1
Chapter Two
11
Chapter Three
29
Chapter Four
49
Chapter Five
69
Chapter Six
81
Chapter Seven
91
Chapter Eight
99
Chapter Nine
111
Chapter Ten
128
Chapter Eleven
140
Chapter Twelve
152
Chapter Thirteen
186
Chapter Fourteen
200
Bibliography
202
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Virginia Woolf was born in London in 1882, the daughter of Sir Leslie Stephen, first editor of The Dictionary of National Biography. From 1915, when she published her first novel, The Voyage Out, Virginia Woolf maintained an astonishing output of fiction, literary criticism, essays, and biography. In 1912, she married Leonard Woolf, and in 1917, they founded The Hogarth Press. Virginia Woolf suffered a series of mental breakdowns throughout her life, and on March 28, 1941, she committed suicide.

Regina Marler is the author of Bloomsbury Pie: The Making of the Bloomsbury Boom and editor of Queer Beats: How the Beats Turned America On to Sex. While still in graduate school, she was chosen by the heirs of Virginia Woolf to edit the letters of Woolf’s artist-sister, Vanessa Bell, which appeared as Selected Letters of Vanessa Bell in 1993. Marler lives in San Francisco.

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