James Weldon Johnson: The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

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ReadHowYouWant.com, May 6, 2009 - African Americans - 196 pages
2 Reviews
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - lilibrarian - LibraryThing

The fictionalized story of a fair-skinned colored man who must decide whether he wants to live life as a black man, or leave everything and pass as white. Read full review

AUTOBIOG OF AN EX COLORED 2K

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Johnson's theme of moral cowardice sets his tragic story of a mulatto in the United States above other sentimental narratives. The unnamed narrator, the offspring of a black mother and white father ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter I
1
Chapter V
62
Chapter VI
84
Chapter VII
97
Chapter VIII
103
Chapter IX
118
Chapter X
140
Chapter XI
181
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Born in Jacksonville Fla. in 1871, James Weldon Johnson was one of the leaders of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. His career was varied and included periods as a teacher, lawyer, songwriter (with his brother J. Rosamond Johnson), and diplomat (as United States Consul to Puerto Cabello, Venezuela, from 1906 to 1909). Among his most famous writings are Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, published anonymously in 1912, and God's Trombones: Seven Negro Sermons in Verse (1927), the winner of the Harmon Gold Award. He was also editor of several anthologies of African-American poetry and spirituals, and in 1933 his autobiography, Along This Way, was published. He served as Secretary to the NAACP from 1916 to 1930 and was a professor of literature at Fisk University in Nashville from 1930 until his death in 1938.

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