Janáček's uncollected essays on music

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Marion Boyars, Oct 1, 1989 - Literary Collections - 253 pages
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Contents

Preface by John Tyrrell
9
Acknowledgements
11
Sources of Illustrations
12
A Biographical Sketch
17
SPEECH MELODY AND CZECH NATIONALISM
31
The Language of our Actors and the Stage
36
Moravany Morawaan
39
Spare Time
45
Carmen and The Bridegrooms 1887
148
The Two Widows
150
Dalibor 1888
153
The Bartered Bride and The Secret
156
Carmen 1891
159
Eugene Onegin
160
Dalibor 1891
164
A Mozart Celebration
167

He Had an Excellent
48
Smetanas Daughter
51
Two London Speeches
58
WHAT I ADMIT
63
How Ideas Came About
69
How Musical Talent Manifests Itself
76
The Fiddlers Child
80
Around Jenufa
84
The Excursions of Mr Broucek
92
Crossroads
97
In the Year 1874
103
What I Admit
105
Concertino
108
Glagolitic Mass
111
Its Dusk
115
An Interview in the Journal Literdrni svet
120
The Development of Opera
125
PERFORMANCES AND COMPOSERS
129
The National Theatre in Brno
136
Antonin Dvorak and Brno The Bartered Bride and Carmen 1886
142
The Academy of Music in Prague
145
Romeo et Juliette by Charles Gounod
170
The Tales of Hoffmann by Offenbach
172
Cavalleria rusticana
174
The Queen of Spades
176
Dr Antonin Dvorak and Brno
180
My Memory of Smetana
183
Looking Back at Antonin Dvorak
185
The Creative Mind
188
On Beethoven
192
It Raises the Alarm
194
TRAVEL AND PLACES
197
A Few Words from a Holiday Journey I
203
Berlin
216
Basta
222
The Sea The Land
229
Biographical Index
235
Index
243
Index of Janaceks Works in the Text
252
Selected Bibliography
254
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Leos Janacek was born in Moravia, part of the Czech Republic. At the age of 10, he was placed at the Augustine monastery in Brno as a chorister. For two years (1872--74), he was a student at Brno Teachers Training College and at the Organ School in Prague, where he studied organ with Skuhersky. He later took lessons in composition with L. Grill at the Leipzig Conservatory. From 1879 to 1880, Janacek studied with Franz Krenn at the Vienna Conservatory. A year later, he returned to Brno, where he conducted the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. Between 1919 and 1925, Janacek taught at the Conservatory of Brno. Many Czech composers of younger generations were his students. Janacek began composing music early in his life in many genres, including choral works, orchestral music, chamber music, and piano music. However, it was not until the 1916 production of his opera Jeji Pastorkyna (Her Foster Daughter), known more widely as Jenufa, that his importance as a composer was realized in the music world. Many of Janacek's operas were based on important Russian literary works. Kat'a Kabanova (1921) and From the House of the Dead (1938) are two such operas. Janacek also believed in the artistic importance of folk songs. He collected a number of folk songs in his native Moravia. Janacek is considered the most important modern Czech composer. In addition to Jenufa, his works include the symphonic poem Taras Bulba (1918) and the Glagolitic Mass (1926), a Latin text translated into Czech. During the last two decades of his life, Janacek was highly influenced by French impressionistic music.

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