Jane Eyre, Volume 1

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Contents

I
1
II
9
III
19
IV
31
V
52
VI
70
VII
80
VIII
93
XII
154
XIII
168
XIV
184
XV
202
XVI
219
XVII
232
XVIII
261
XIX
282

IX
104
X
115
XI
131

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Page 156 - Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts as much as their brothers do...
Page vii - I think I see in him an intellect profounder and more unique than his contemporaries have yet recognized ; because I regard him as the first social regenerator of the day — as the very master of that working corps who would restore to rectitude the warped system of things...
Page 14 - If they did not love me, in fact as little did I love them. They were not bound to regard with affection a thing that could not sympathize with one amongst them, — a heterogeneous thing, opposed to them in temperament, in capacity, in propensities...
Page 48 - Something of vengeance I had tasted for the first time; as aromatic wine it seemed, on swallowing, warm and racy : its after-flavour, metallic and corroding, gave me a sensation as if I had been poisoned.
Page 60 - Silence!' ejaculated a voice; not that of Miss Miller, but one of the upper teachers, a little and dark personage, smartly dressed, but of somewhat morose aspect, who installed herself at the top of one table, while a more buxom lady presided at the other. I looked in vain for her I had first seen the night before; she was not visible: Miss Miller occupied the foot of the table where I sat, and a strange, foreign-looking, elderly lady, the French teacher, as I afterwards found, took the corresponding...
Page 32 - Here, leaning over the banister, I cried out suddenly, and without at all deliberating on my words - 'They are not fit to associate with me.' Mrs Reed was rather a stout woman; but, on hearing this strange and audacious declaration, she ran nimbly up the stair, swept me like a whirlwind into the nursery, and crushing me down on the edge of my crib, dared me in an emphatic voice to rise from that place, or utter one syllable during the remainder of the day. 'What would Uncle Reed say to you, if he...
Page 152 - ... with only one little window at the far end, and looking, with its two rows of small black doors all shut, like a corridor in some Bluebeard's castle. While I paced softly on, the last sound I expected to hear in so still a region, a laugh, struck my ear. It was a curious laugh; distinct, formal, mirthless. I stopped: the sound ceased, only for an instant; it began again, louder: for at first, though distinct, it was very low. It passed off in a clamorous peal that seemed to wake an echo in every...
Page 2 - I soon possessed myself of a volume, taking care that it should be one stored with pictures. I mounted into the window-seat ; gathering up my feet, I sat crosslegged like a Turk ; and having drawn the red moreen curtain nearly close, I was shrined in double retirement.
Page 194 - And so may you," I thought. My eye met his as the idea crossed my mind : he seemed to read the glance, answering as if its import had been spoken as well as imagined : — " Yes, yes, you are right," said he ; "I have plenty of faults of my own : I know it, and I don't wish to palliate them, I assure you. God wot I need not be too severe about others ; I have a past existence, a series of deeds, a...
Page 38 - In uttering these words I looked up: he seemed to me a tall gentleman; but then I was very little; his features were large, and they and all the lines of his frame were equally harsh and prim. 'Well, Jane Eyre, and are you a good child?' Impossible to reply to this in the affirmative: my little world held a contrary opinion: I was silent. Mrs Reed answered for me by an expressive shake of the head, adding soon, 'Perhaps the less said on that subject the better, Mr Brocklehurst.' 'Sorry indeed to...

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