Jane Eyre: an Autobiography

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Smith Elder, 1848 - 911 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
20
III
60
IV
90
V
110
VI
140
VII
183
VIII
197
IX
217
X
253
XI
281

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Page 286 - I REQUIRE and charge you both, as ye will answer at the dreadful day of judgment when the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed, that if either of you know any impediment, why ye may not be lawfully joined together in Matrimony, ye do now confess it. For be ye well assured, that so many as are coupled together otherwise than God's Word doth allow are not joined together by God; neither is their Matrimony lawful.
Page 298 - I wished to have" (laying his hand on my shoulder): " this young, girl who stands so grave and quiet at the mouth of hell, looking collectedly at the gambols of a demon. I wanted her just as a change after that fierce ragout. Wood and Briggs, look at the difference! Compare these clear eyes with the red balls yonder — this face with that mask — this form with that bulk...
Page 240 - It might pass for the present,' he said; 'but he would yet see me glittering like a parterre.' Glad was I to get him out of the silk warehouse, and then out of a jeweller's shop: the more he bought me, the more my cheek burned with a sense of annoyance and degradation. As we re-entered the carriage, and I sat back feverish and fagged, I remembered what, in the hurry of events, dark and bright, I had wholly forgotten - the letter of my uncle, John Eyre, to Mrs Reed: his intention to adopt me and make...
Page 120 - What crime was this, that lived incarnate in this sequestered mansion, and could neither be expelled nor subdued by the owner ? —What mystery, that broke out, now in fire and now in blood, at the deadest hours of night ? What creature was it, that, masked in an ordinary woman's face and shape, uttered the voice, now of a mocking demon, and anon of a carrion-seeking bird of prey...
Page 289 - Creole — at — church, Spanish Town, Jamaica. The record of the marriage will be found in the register of that church — a copy of it is now in my possession. Signed Richard Mason.
Page 28 - They're coming, ma'am,' was the answer. 'They'll be here in ten minutes.' Adele flew to the window. I followed, taking care to stand on one side, so that, screened by the curtain, I could see without being seen. The ten minutes John had given seemed very long, but at last wheels were heard; four equestrians galloped up the drive, and after them came two open carriages. Fluttering veils and waving plumes filled the vehicles; two of the cavaliers were young, dashing-looking...
Page 18 - Listen, then, Jane Eyre, to your sentence: tomorrow, place the glass before you, and draw in chalk your own picture, faithfully, without softening one defect; omit no harsh line, smooth away no displeasing irregularity; write under it, 'Portrait of a Governess, disconnected, poor, and plain.
Page 285 - I require and charge you both, as ye will answer at the dreadful day of judgment, when the secrets of all hearts shall be disclosed...
Page 295 - In the deep shade, at the further end of the room, a figure ran backwards and forwards. What it was, whether beast or human being, one could not, at first sight, tell : it grovelled, seemingly, on all fours ; it snatched and growled like some strange wild animal : but it was covered with clothing ; and a quantity of dark, grizzled hair, wild as a mane, hid its head and face. " Good-morrow, Mrs. Poole ! " said Mr. Rochester. " How are you ? and how is your charge to-day ? " "We're tolerable, sir,...
Page 214 - But what had befallen the night? The moon was not yet set, and we were all in shadow: I could scarcely see my master's face, near as I was. And what ailed the chestnut tree ? it writhed and groaned ; while wind roared in the laurel walk, and came sweeping over us.

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