Japan, Internationalism, and the UN

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Psychology Press, 1997 - History - 192 pages
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Japan has enormous economic power and yet is a minor player in international politics. In part this has been due to the partnership with US, but now with the end of cold war there is a fierce debate going on in Japan regarding the international political role for the nation. This book is a response to the issues raised and was originally published in Japanese for a Japanese audience. Ronald Dore provides a full analysis of Japan's post war international position and in particular its role within the UN, the use of armed force and constitution. Japan, Internationalism and the UN provides a unique insight into Japan's foreign policy and its related domestic politics. It is the product of nearly half a century of study and discussion with the Japanese themselves about their place in the world.
 

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Contents

Philosophies of history
3
The early stirrings of internationalism
16
The birth of the United Nations
29
The use of armed force
37
The enactment of Japans Peace Constitution
52
From the worlds United Nations to the United Nations as no mans land
60
The revival of the UN
81
Japans international role and the Constitution
95
Wanting to throw off a nasty burden but suppressing the urge
143
Contributions yes but geared to the complex needs of a complex world
148
To die for high principle?
156
Economic and cultural rather than military contributions
160
The need to wait for a generation change
162
Limits on the spirit of selfsacrifice
169
The advantages of diversity
171
The fork in the road
176

A UNcentred foreign policy and bilateral relations
112
The restructuring and strengthening of the UN A survey of the issues
126
Other points of view
141
Notes
178
Index
185
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