Japanese Architecture as a Collaborative Process: Opportunities in a Flexible Construction Culture

Front Cover
Taylor & Francis, 2001 - Architecture - 182 pages
Architects throughout the world hold Japan's best architecture in high regard, considering the country's buildings among the world's most carefully crafted and innovative. While many books, magazines, and exhibitions have focused on the results of architectural practice in Japan, this book is the first to explain the reasons for Japan's remarkable structures. Architecture does not occur in isolation; Japan's architects are able to collaborate with a wide variety of people from professional consultants to constructors.
Dana Buntrock discusses architecture as a part of the construction community, moving from historical precedents that predate the emergence of the architectural profession in Japan through to contemporary practices.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
List of plates
2
2
8
The carpenter as architect
9
2
15
Design in the nineteenth century
16
117
21
Education and the professions
23
1
94
Two paths to customization
100
1
103
Implications in architecture
108
Fujisawa Gymnasium
110
87
116
151
117
13
126

Transferring knowledge from the university
31
Leading architects as lead users
39
Floor section at fabricators
43
148
64
Itos office tries out a proposed
69
Collaborators
72
Office building in Tokyo designed
75
Consultants and constructors in alliance
78
finish joint alternatives
83
Innovating through team effort
84
6
86
Selecting subcontractors
91
Avantgarde architecture in the public realm
128
Pressure to perform
134
1
136
Cronyism and descending from heaven
140
Saitama University designed
143
Legal issues
148
Twostory tube section Mediatheque
165
Conclusion
169
Index
177
67
179
145
181
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Dana Buntrock is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley.

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