JavaScript & JQuery: The Missing Manual

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"O'Reilly Media, Inc.", Oct 21, 2011 - Computers - 518 pages

JavaScript lets you supercharge your web pages with animation, interactivity, and visual effects, but learning the language isn't easy. This fully updated and expanded guide takes you step-by-step through JavaScript basics, then shows you how to save time and effort with jQuery--the library of prewritten JavaScript code--and the newest innovations from the jQuery UI plug-in.

The important stuff you need to know:

  • Make your pages come alive. Use jQuery to create interactive elements that respond to visitor input.
  • Get acquainted with jQuery UI. Expand your interface with tabbed panels, dialog boxes, date pickers, and other widgets.
  • Display good forms. Get information from visitors, help shoppers buy goods, and let members post their thoughts.
  • Go beyond the browser with Ajax. Communicate with the web server to update your pages without reloading.
  • Put your new skills right to work. Create a simple application step-by-step, using jQuery and jQuery UI widgets.
  • Dive into advanced concepts. Use ThemeRoller to customize your widgets; avoid common errors that new programmers often make.
 

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very well written, easy to understand

Contents

Introduction
1
Getting Started with JavaScript
19
Getting Started with jQuery
115
Building Web Page Features
205
Ajax Communication with the Web Server
339
Tips Tricks and Troubleshooting
401
JavaScript Resources
497
Index
503
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

David Sawyer McFarland is president of Sawyer McFarland Media, Inc., a Web development and training company in Portland, Oregon. He's been building websites since 1995, when he designed an online magazine for communication professionals. He's served as webmaster at the University of California at Berkeley and the Berkeley Multimedia Research Center, and oversaw a complete CSS-driven redesign of Macworld.com. David is also a writer and trainer, and teaches in the Portland State University multimedia program. He wrote the bestselling Missing Manual titles on Adobe Dreamweaver, CSS, and JavaScript.

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