Jay and Ellsworth, the First Courts: Justices, Rulings and Legacy

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ABC-CLIO, 2008 - Law - 309 pages
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When the Supreme Court was established in 1789, no other country had a judicial body quite like it. The early justices struggled to give definition to such concepts as "judicial review" and "separation of powers." The early court approached its role in ways that would be startling today, often using its power to support the new government rather than merely serving as an independent arbiter.

The Jay-Ellsworth Courts were the first to take up the role of interpreting the constitution, and their approach influenced constitutional debates for the next two centuries. Clearly, this is a book for any reader who wishes to understand how the court was initially set up and how it functioned in our early judicial history.

 

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Contents

Justices Rulings and Legacy 1 The Supreme Court in the Early Republic
1
Justices Rulings and Legacy 2 The Justices
31
Justices Rulings and Legacy 3 Cases and Controversies
73
Justices Rulings and Legacy 4 Legacy and Impact
167
Justices Rulings and Legacy Selected Documents
205
Justices Rulings and Legacy Key People Laws and Events
225
Justices Rulings and Legacy Chronology
257
Justices Rulings and Legacy List of Cases
269
Justices Rulings and Legacy Glossary
271
Justices Rulings and Legacy Annotated Bibliography
287
Justices Rulings and Legacy Index
297
Justices Rulings and Legacy About the Author
309
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Matthew P. Harrington is assistant dean at the George Washington University Law School, Washington, DC, where he specializes in legal and economic history.

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