Jeni's Inbox: A Quirky Tale of Love and Mail.

Front Cover
AuthorHouse, Mar 22, 2005 - Humor - 436 pages

Tired of women who don’t leave a lasting impression? Then read on. I’m 26, professional, attractive (Sarah Jessica Parker look-alike), fit, intelligent and ambitious. Enjoy adventure and the good things in life. Positive attitude, healthy lifestyle and no baggage. If you want to leave me a lasting impression, reply Box 3307, The National Mail.

 

Jeni Santos, copywriter of the above, is surprisingly, exactly as described – well, except the baggage – but it’s not very heavy, more like a cute carry-on holding a small assortment of necessary personal doubts, family hang-ups and unanswered questions: “Am I a good person?” “Why am I here?” “Will my dreams come true?” and the grandest of all, “Will I ever find true love?”

Saddened by the betrayal of her first love, and disappointed with the endless parade of emotionally unavailable men to which dating has exposed her, she sets up a personal ad. We follow Jeni as she navigates the emotionally uncertain maze of romance and career - a world that will become much more surprising and unpredictable as responses to her ad flood in. Funny, heartfelt and surprising, ‘Jeni’s Inbox’ is a refreshing and uplifting look at the eternal and universal hope for love.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2005)

David Evans is a first-time author. ‘Jeni’s Inbox,’ was inspired by the experiences of a woman he dated briefly after answering her personal ad. David’s professional life has led him from one end of Canada to the other, crossing career paths like Venetian bridges. In addition to the sundry jobs of a struggling artist, his main occupational transitions were from a ten-year career as an actor where his last professional appearance was as ‘Puck’ in ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ to Air Traffic Controller, and finally, to pharmaceutical sales. He sums up this journey as follows:

 

‘I went from playing a fairy to pushing tin to dealing drugs…’

 

David, his wife Sandi and their daughters Cailey and Brooklyn live in Montreal.

Bibliographic information