Jeremiah Joyce: Radical, Dissenter and Writer

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2006 - History - 185 pages
Jeremiah Joyce was one of the accused in the famous Treason Trials of 1794, which marked the suppression of radical agitation in Britain for the ensuing twenty years. He was a political radical who imbibed the traditions of the 'commonwealthman' and actively campaigned for a more democratic and representative state. Through the early 1790s, he acted as the metropolitan political agent for his patron the Earl of Stanhope and he liased between radical groups whilst also distributing radical literature including Tom Paine's Rights of Man. He was one of the very few artisans at the end of the eighteenth century adopted by the literary and scientific intelligentsia and was unique in training to become a Unitarian minister at the age of 23 after serving a seven-year trade apprenticeship and having worked as a journeyman.
 

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Contents

Early Life in Cheshunt
3
Hackney College Radicalism and Dissent
26
Political Notoriety and the Charge of Treason
45
Release and Reception
58
Joyce in the Unitarian World
78
Respectable Sermons
92
A Literary Apprenticeship
107
Publishing with Sir Richard Phillips
136
Publishing with the House of Longmans
156
Publishing with Sherwood Neely and C J Barrington
170
Index
183
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

John Issitt teaches in the areas of philosophy, history and educational studies for the University of York and the Open University, UK.

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