Jerry Bywaters: A Life in Art

Front Cover
University of Texas Press, Jan 1, 1994 - Art - 282 pages
As an artist, art critic, museum director, and art educator, Jerry Bywaters reshaped the Texas art world and attracted national recognition for Texas artists. This first full-scale biography explores his life and work in the context of twentieth-century American art, revealing Bywaters' important role in the development of regionalist painting. Francine Carraro delves into all aspects of Bywaters' career. As an artist, Bywaters became a central figure and spokesman for a group of young, energetic painters known as the Dallas Nine (Alexandre Hogue, Everett Spruce, Otis Dozier, William Lester, and others) who broke out of the limitations of provincialism and attained national recognition beginning in the 1930s. As director of the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, art critic for the Dallas Morning News, and professor of art and art history at Southern Methodist University, Bywaters became a champion of the arts in Texas. Carraro traces his strong supporting role in professionalizing art institutions in Texas and defending the right to display art considered "subversive" in the McCarthy era. From these discussions emerges a finely drawn portrait of an artist who used a vocabulary of regional images to explore universal themes. It will be of interest to all students of American studies, national and regional art history, and twentieth-century biography.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

GROWING UP TEXAN
1
ON BECOMING AN ARTIST
8
A HOTBED FOR INDIGENOUS ART
26
THE FIGHT FOR ACCEPTANCE
42
THE TEXAS SCENE IS THE AMERICAN SCENE
56
A NEW DEAL FOR ART
75
THE TEXAS RENAISSANCE
86
BYWATERS PAINTS AMERICA
110
THE REGIONAL MUSEUM
144
REDr WHITE AND BLUE ART AT THE DALLAS MUSEUM
170
A SYMPATHETIC EYE
203
A REGIONALIST REDISCOVERED
221
notes
233
bibliography
259
index
273
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1994)

Francine Carraro is the Executive Director of the Grace Museum in Abilene, Texas. She has researched and written extensively on twentieth-century American and Southwestern art.

Bibliographic information