Jesus and John Wayne: How White Evangelicals Corrupted a Faith and Fractured a Nation

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Liveright Publishing, Jun 23, 2020 - History - 384 pages
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

The “paradigm-influencing” book (Christianity Today) that is fundamentally transforming our understanding of white evangelicalism in America.

Jesus and John Wayne is a sweeping, revisionist history of the last seventy-five years of white evangelicalism, revealing how evangelicals have worked to replace the Jesus of the Gospels with an idol of rugged masculinity and Christian nationalism—or in the words of one modern chaplain, with “a spiritual badass.”

As acclaimed scholar Kristin Du Mez explains, the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the centrality of popular culture in contemporary American evangelicalism. Many of today’s evangelicals might not be theologically astute, but they know their VeggieTales, they’ve read John Eldredge’s Wild at Heart, and they learned about purity before they learned about sex—and they have a silver ring to prove it. Evangelical books, films, music, clothing, and merchandise shape the beliefs of millions. And evangelical culture is teeming with muscular heroes—mythical warriors and rugged soldiers, men like Oliver North, Ronald Reagan, Mel Gibson, and the Duck Dynasty clan, who assert white masculine power in defense of “Christian America.” Chief among these evangelical legends is John Wayne, an icon of a lost time when men were uncowed by political correctness, unafraid to tell it like it was, and did what needed to be done.

Challenging the commonly held assumption that the “moral majority” backed Donald Trump in 2016 and 2020 for purely pragmatic reasons, Du Mez reveals that Trump in fact represented the fulfillment, rather than the betrayal, of white evangelicals’ most deeply held values: patriarchy, authoritarian rule, aggressive foreign policy, fear of Islam, ambivalence toward #MeToo, and opposition to Black Lives Matter and the LGBTQ community. A much-needed reexamination of perhaps the most influential subculture in this country, Jesus and John Wayne shows that, far from adhering to biblical principles, modern white evangelicals have remade their faith, with enduring consequences for all Americans.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Bill.Bradford - LibraryThing

A lot of attention has been paid over the past few years to the rise of the “nones”, those who have no religious affiliation. The numbers of those identifying as white evangelical have been dropping ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mst3k4L - LibraryThing

A good read, but I really wish there would good examples of Godly men to follow. William Wilberforce is a great example of a Godly man who has conviction and wants to protect people, but does so in a ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
SADDLING
JOHN WAYNE WILL SAVE YOUR
GODS GIFT TO
DISCIPLINE AND COMMAND
SLAVES AND SOLDIERS
GOING FOR THE JUGULAR
THE GREATEST AMERICAN HERO
NO MORE CHRISTIAN NICE
HOLY BALLS
PILGRIMS PROGRESS IN CAMO
WHY WE WANT TO KILL
SPIRITUAL BADASSES
A NEW HIGH PRIEST
A HISTORY
Acknowledgments

WAR FOR THE SOUL
TENDER WARRIORS

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About the author (2020)

Kristin Kobes Du Mez is a professor of history at Calvin University and the author of A New Gospel for Women. She has written for the Washington Post, Christianity Today, Christian Century, and Religion & Politics, among other publications. She lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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