Jewish Children

Front Cover
A.A. Knopf, 1921 - Jewish fiction - 268 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
9
II
20
III
33
IV
38
V
50
VI
58
VII
71
VIII
79
XI
106
XII
119
XIII
131
XIV
143
XV
153
XVI
178
XVII
187
XVIII
210

IX
89
X
99
XIX
241

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 263 - Set me as a seal upon thine heart, as a seal upon thine arm: for love is strong as death; jealousy is cruel as the grave: the coals thereof are coals of fire, which hath a most vehement flame.
Page 8 - BEHOLD, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair; Thou hast doves' eyes within thy locks : Thy hair is as a flock of goats, that appear from mount Gilead. Thy teeth are like a flock of sheep that are even shorn, which came up from the washing ; Whereof every one bear twins, and none is barren among them.
Page 89 - Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; let us lodge in the villages. Let us get up early to the vineyards; let us see if the vine flourish, whether the tender grape appear, and the pomegranates bud forth: there will I give thee my loves.
Page 254 - I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.
Page 9 - Thy lips are like a thread of scarlet, and thy speech is comely: Thy temples are like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks. Thy...
Page 245 - Spikenard and saffron ; calamus and cinnamon, with all trees of frankincense; myrrh and aloes, with all the chief spices : A fountain of gardens, a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon.
Page 261 - Thy lips, O my spouse, drop as the honeycomb: honey and milk are under thy tongue; and the smell of thy garments is like the smell of Lebanon.
Page 17 - Make haste, my beloved, and be thou like to a roe or to a young hart upon the mountains of spices.
Page 30 - See, to the dregs," said mother to father. To me she said: "A full cup of wine! You will drop off to sleep." Ha! Ha! Will I fall asleep? Not even if we were to sit up all the night, or even to broad daylight. "Well," said my father, "how are you going to ask the Four Questions?
Page 32 - And who else would be to blame for this but my mother, with her "fall asleep, fall asleep." And as I was thinking these thoughts, I heard the creaking of the door. My father stood up and cried: "Blessed art thou who comest in the name of the Eternal." I looked towards the door. Yes, it was he. He came in so slowly and so softly that one scarcely heard him. He was a handsome man, Elijah the Prophet — an old man with a long grizzled beard reaching to his knees. His face was yellow and wrinkled, but...

Bibliographic information