Jews, Christians and Jewish Christians in Antiquity

Front Cover
Mohr Siebeck, 2010 - History - 538 pages
0 Reviews
The book, which consists of some previously published and unpublished essays, examines a variety of issues relevant to the study of ancient Judaism and Christianity and their interaction, including polemic, proselytism, biblical interpretation, messianism, the phenomenon normally described as Jewish Christianity, and the fate of the Jewish community after the Bar Kokhba revolt, a period of considerable importance for the emergence not only of Judaism but also of Christianity. The volume, typically for a collection of essays, does not lay out a particular thesis. If anything binds the collection together, it is the author's attempt to set out the major fault lines in current debate about these disputed subjects, and in the process to reveal their complex and entangled character.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

AntiJudaism and early Christian identity
43
Barnabas 9 4 a peculiar verse on circumcision
77
Bibliography
88
Messianism and resistance amongst Jews
103
Christian messianism in Egypt
113
Bibliography
120
Jews in Alexandria from our city to an alien place
126
Christians in Alexandria
137
Some observations on Josephus and Christianity
185
The Four among the Jews
267
The definition of the term Jewish Christian
289
Some definitions of the term from F C Baur to the Second
297
More recent study
308
The Ebionites in recent research
325
The enigma of the second century
383
PseudoClementine Homilies 46 rare evidence
427

the Jewish and Christian image of Alexandria
143
Jewish proselytism at the time of Christian origins
149
Critique of positions opposed to the idea of Jewish proselytism
157
Conclusion
179
Index of Ancient and Christian Sources
493
Index of Authors
523
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

James Carleton Paget, Born 1966; 1992 PhD at Cambridge University; currently Senior Lecturer in New Testament Studies at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow and Tutor of Peterhouse.

Bibliographic information