Jim Crow's Counterculture: The Blues and Black Southerners, 1890-1945

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LSU Press, 2010 - Music - 300 pages
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In Jim Crow's Counterculture, R. A. Lawson offers a cultural history of blues musicians in the segregation era, explaining how by both accommodating and resisting Jim Crow life, blues musicians created a counterculture to incubate and nurture ideas of black individuality and citizenship. These individuals, Lawson shows, collectively demonstrate the African-American struggle during early twentieth century.

 

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User Review  - brentsimpson - LibraryThing

Insightful approach into the motivations of Blues singers over a seminal period of American social, political, and musical history. Read full review

Contents

Call and Response The Blues of Accommodation the Blues of Resistance
1
To Be Black Is to Be Blue The Blues Profession and Negotiating the Black Place during Jim Crow
23
Leavin the Jim Crow Town The Great Migration and the Bluess Broadening Horizon
81
Illustrations
116
Jim Crows War for Democracy The Blues People and World War I
116
Workin on the Project The Blues of the Great Flood and Great Depression
128
Uncle Sam Called Me World War II and the Blues Counterculture of Inclusion
169
Discography
201
Notes
211
Bibliography
245
Index
267
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About the author (2010)

R. A. "Stovetop" Lawson is associate professor of history at Dean College and visiting associate professor of graduate studies at Trinity College. He lives in Franklin, Massachusetts.

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