Jimgrim and the Lost Trooper

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Wildside Press, Jan 1, 2008 - Fiction - 160 pages
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Adventures in Araby -- what is now Palestine and Israel and Jordan and Saudi Arabia and Iraq -- with Jimgrim -- Major James Schuyler Grim -- and assorted adventurers.

You wouldn't find a tougher, less easily stampeded gang in Asia Minor than the party Grim had left with me. They spat on their cartridges and crammed them in like veteran soldiers instead of the thieves they were by trade, and each bullet was loosed on its way with an appropriate curse, until Narayan Singh on the far right laughed so that he could hardly shoot straight. And the camels went down one by one like great ships sinking, pitching up their sterns as they plunged bow first.

But that war-cry, "Allaho Akbar!" is something more than a formula. It seems to fire the men who use it with a frenzy that bullets can't quench. Camels fell, but their riders charged forward on foot, and by that time they could guess how few we were, which added confidence to fury. The amount of nickel-coated lead that a charging Arab can eat up as he comes is incredible. There isn't an animal -- not even a bear -- that can compare with him. That gang of fanatics charged home -- got right into the middle of us -- and used their knives to such effect that Ali Baba and his youngest son Mahommed were the only two who hadn't some sort of wound to show by the time we had beaten off their survivors.

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About the author (2008)

Talbot Mundy (born William Lancaster Gribbon) (April 23, 1879 - August 5, 1940) was an English writer. He also wrote under the pseudonym Walter Galt. Born in London, at age 16 he ran away from home and began an odyssey in India, Africa, and other parts of the Near and Far East. By age 29, he had begun using the name Talbot Mundy, and a year later arrived in the United States, starting his writing career in 1911. His novel King of the Khyber Rifles is set in India under British Occupation. The long buildup to the introduction to Yasmini and the scenes among the outlaws in the Khinjan Caves clearly influenced fantasy writers Robert E. Howard and Leigh Brackett. His related Jim Grim series, which has mystical overtones and part of which is available over the web from theosophical sites, ran in Adventure magazine before book publication. Mundy was associated with Theosophy's movement and helped popularize the legend of the Nine Unknown Men in the West. He wrote many other books and stories, including Hira Singh and a number of stories about Tros of Samothrace, a Greek freedom fighter who aided Britons and Druids in their fight against Julius Caesar.

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