Jimmy Corrigan: the smartest kid on earth

Front Cover
Pantheon Books, Sep 12, 2000 - Comics & Graphic Novels - 380 pages
30 Reviews
This first book from Chicago author Chris Ware is a pleasantly-decorated view at a lonely and emotionally-impaired "everyman" (Jimmy Corrigan, the Smartest Kid on Earth), who is provided, at age 36, the opportunity to meet his father for the first time. An improvisatory romance which gingerly deports itself between 1890's Chicago and 1980's small town Michigan, the reader is helped along by thousands of colored illustrations and diagrams, which, when read rapidly in sequence, provide a convincing illusion of life and movement. The bulk of the work is supported by fold-out instructions, an index, paper cut-outs, and a brief apology, all of which concrete to form a rich portrait of a man stunted by a paralyzing fear of being disliked.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
16
4 stars
4
3 stars
6
2 stars
3
1 star
1

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - klburnside - LibraryThing

I thought this book was going to be a real winner. The reviews on the inside cover included praise from Dave Eggers and David Sedaris among others. The story takes place at a number of different time ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - patsaintsfan - LibraryThing

Well... I must admit that I read this in one sitting, but I felt awful when I finished. Actually, I did while reading it too! It kept my attention, which is a positive in my opinion, but wow!, I just don't know what words to use to describe this book... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
Section 2
Section 3

15 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2000)

Bill Blackbeard, the founder-director of the San Francisco Cartoon Art Museum, is the world's foremost authority on early 20th Century American comic strips. As a freelance writer, Blackbeard wrote, edited or contributed to more than 200 books on cartoons and comic strips, including "The Smithsonian Collection of Newspaper Comics", "100 Years of Comic Strips", and the "Krazy & Ignatz" series.

Bibliographic information