Joan of Arc, Vol. 1: The Authorized Uniform Edition

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Wildside Press LLC, 2003 - Fiction - 336 pages
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This fictionalized "biography" told by an intimate companion of Joan of Arc was thought by Mark Twain to be his finest work. It was hugely popular in its time, and while the tastes of subsequent generations may have elevated HUCKLEBERRY FINN and THE MYSTERIOUS STRANGER to a higher level, JOAN OF ARC still remains one of Twain's most colorful and passionately-imagined books.
 

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Contents

When Wolves Ran Free in Paris
3
The Faery Tree of Domremy
7
All Aflame with Love of France
25
Joan Tames the Mad Man
36
Domremy Pillaged and Burned
49
Joan and Archangel Michael
61
She Delivers the Divine Command
71
Why the Scorners Relented
82
CHAP PAGB XI The War March is Begun
179
Joan Puts Heart in Her Army
184
Checked by the Folly of the Wise
193
What the English Answered
202
My Exquisite Poem Goes to Smash
205
The Finding of the Dwarf
217
Sweet Fruit of Bitter Truth
230
Joans First Battlefield
234

BOOK II
85
Joan Says Gcodby
87
The Governor Speeds Joan
90
The Paladin Groans and Boasts
99
Joan Leads Us through the Enemy
108
We Pierce the Last Ambuscades
120
Joan Convinces the King
136
Our Paladin in His Glory
147
Joan Persuades Her Inquisitors
157
She is Made Generalinchief
168
The Maids Sword and Banner
172
We Burst in upon Ghosts
242
Joan Makes Cowards Brave Victors
246
She Gently Reproves Her Dear Friend
254
The Fate of France Decided
265
Joan Inspires the Tawdry King
271
Tinsel Trappings of Nobility
282
At LastForward
287
The Last Doubts Scattered
294
How Joan Took Jargeau
300
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About the author (2003)

Mark Twain was born Samuel L. Clemens in Florida, Missouri on November 30, 1835. He worked as a printer for a time, and then became a steamboat pilot. He traveled in the West, writing humorous sketches for newspapers. In 1865, he wrote the short story, The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County, which was very well received. He then began a career as a humorous travel writer and lecturer, publishing The Innocents Abroad in 1869, Roughing It in 1872, and, co-authored with Charles Dudley Warner, Gilded Age in 1873. His best-known works are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876), Mississippi Writing: Life on the Mississippi (1883), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). He died of a heart attack on April 21, 1910.

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