Joan of Arc, an epic poem, Volume 2

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Page 39 - And I saw an angel standing in the sun; and he cried with a loud voice, saying to all the fowls that fly in the midst of heaven, Come and gather yourselves together unto the supper of the great God. That ye may eat the flesh of kings, and the flesh of captains, and the flesh of mighty men, and the flesh of horses, and of them that sit on them, and the flesh of all men, both free and bond, both small and great.
Page 40 - Ye shall eat the flesh of the mighty, and drink the blood of the princes of the earth, of rams, of lambs, and of goats, of bullocks, all of them fatlings of Bashan. And ye shall eat fat till ye be full, and drink blood till ye be drunken, of my sacrifice which I have sacrificed for you. Thus ye shall be filled at my table with horses and chariots, with mighty men, and with all men of war, saith the Lord God.
Page 40 - God : speak unto every feathered fowl, and to every beast of the field, assemble yourselves, and come ; gather yourselves on every side to my sacrifice that I do sacrifice for you, even a great sacrifice upon the mountains of Israel, that ye may eat flesh, and drink blood. Ye shall eat the flesh of the mighty, and drink the blood of the princes of the earth, of rams, of lambs, and of goats, of bullocks, all of them fatlings of Bashan.
Page 40 - And, thou son of man, thus saith the Lord God, speak unto every feathered fowl, and to every beast of the field, assemble yourselves and come, gather yourselves on every side to my sacrifice that I do sacrifice for you, even a great sacrifice upon the mountains of Israel, that ye may eat flesh, and drink blood.
Page 270 - I am a king, and fit it is That these should perish for me ! ' if thy realm Should, through the counsels of thy government, Be filled with woe, and in thy streets be heard The voice of mourning and the feeble cry Of asking hunger ; if at such a time Thou dost behold thy...
Page 17 - The troops which they conducted were inured to war, and were determined to make the most obstinate resistance ; and even the inhabitants, disciplined by the long continuance of hostilities, were well qualified, in their own defence, to second the efforts of the most veteran forces. The eyes of all Europe were turned towards this scene ; where, it was reasonably supposed, the French were to make their last stand for maintaining the independence of their monarchy and the rights of their sovereign.
Page 269 - The Maid exclaimed, and fell upon the ground And clasped his knees, " I do beseech thee King ! ~" By all the millions that depend on thee, " For weal or woe— consider what thou art, " And know thy duty ! if thou dost oppress " Thy, people, if to aggrandize thyself...
Page 252 - Caput apri defero Reddens laudes Domino. The boar's head in hand bring I, With garlands gay and rosemary. I pray you, all sing merrily Qui estis in convivio.
Page 78 - The Englishmen, perceiving that thei within could not long continue for faute of vitaile and pouder, kepte not their watche so diligently as thei were accustomed, nor scoured now the countrey environed as thei before had ordained.
Page 269 - She cried, " at Chinon, when my gifted eye Knew thee disguised, what inwardly the Spirit Prompted, I spake— armed with the sword of God, To drive from Orleans far the English wolves, And crown thee in the rescued walls of Rheims. All is accomplished. I have here this day Fulfilled my mission, and anointed thee Chief servant of the people. Of this charge, Or well performed or wickedly, high heaven Shall take account. If that thine heart b« good, I know no limit to the happiness Thou mayst create....

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