Joey the Hitman: The Autobiography of a Mafia Killer

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Thunder's Mouth Press, 2002 - Biography & Autobiography - 265 pages
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Following up on the success of the Adrenaline title Mob: Stories of Death and Betrayal from Organized Crime, Adrenaline Classics brings back the New York Times bestseller (originally published as Killer) that helped pave the way for the latest generation of nouveau-mob stories, from Donnie Brasco to The Sopranos. “Joey”—a journeyman Jewish hitman, numbers king, and loan shark—collaborated with David Fisher (co-editor of the hit Adrenaline title Wild Blue) to lay out the rackets in gripping detail. His story includes detailed accounts of his chillingly “professional” murders of thirty-eight victims. The strong sales of Mob are further evidence that the best mafia stories—and this is one of the best—capture the public’s interest. Joey the Hitman’s original best-seller status reflects the quality of the writing, the frank intelligence of the subject/writer, and Joey’s convincingly matter-of-fact, regular-guy tone. When he writes, debunking The Godfather, “... Actually very few mob members even have Bronx-Italian accents ... a lot of mob people are not very tough, the people we meet and deal with are very ordinary, most of us stay home at night and watch TV, and we only shoot each other when absolutely necessary,” you know you’re listening to the original Soprano. This edition includes a new afterword from David Fisher, who for the first time reveals Joey's identity and the incredible story of how Joey finally died.

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Joey the Hit Man : The Autobiography of a Mafia Killer (Adrenaline Classics Series)

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"This book proves that professional crime can be as fascinating as amateur crime," said LJ's reviewer of this volume in which a veteran mob cleaner, under the pseudonym "Joey," describes in detail ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

David Fisher collaborated with baseball umpire Ron Luciano on his two best sellers. Both "The Umpire Strides Back" & "Strike Two" were "New York Times" best sellers. "Umpire" was excerpted two consecutive weeks by "Sports Illustrated", the first time that magazine ever did so. Fisher also collaborated with baseball manager Tommy Lasorda on his best selling autobiography "The Artful Dodger", as well as with San Diego Chargers former owner Gene Klein on the extremely well-reviewed football story, "First Down & a Billion". He also wrote the recent "New York Times" best sellers "Been There, Done That" with Eddie Fisher and "Leonard: My Fifty-Year Friendship with a Remarkable Man" with William Shatner.

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