John Asgill on Several Assertions Proved, 1696, Volume 2, Issue 2

Front Cover
Lord Baltimore Press, The Friedenwald Company, 1906 - Money - 38 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - What we call commodities is nothing but land severed from the soil — Man deals in nothing but earth. The merchants are the factors of the world, to exchange one part of the earth for another. The king himself is fed by the labour of the ox: and the clothing of the army and victualling of the navy must all be paid for to the owner of the soil as the ultimate receiver.
Page 14 - Man deals in nothing but earth. The merchants are the factors of the world, to exchange one part of the earth for another. The king himself is fed by the labour of the ox: and the clothing of the army and victualling of the navy must all be paid for to the owner of the soil as the ultimate receiver. All things in the world are originally the produce of the ground, and there must all things be raised.
Page 15 - Securites of Land, form'd into the Qualities of Monies, (which we call Bills) it would force other Contracts to be made payable in these Bills, and consequently make these Bills effective Money Secondly, As they would thereby become effective Money, so they would become Lawful Money of England; because the Law would compel the payment of them. The Law of...
Page 3 - That system which represents the produce of land as the sole source of the revenue and wealth of every country has, so far as I know, never been adopted by any nation, and it at present exists only in the speculations of a few men of great learning and ingenuity in France.
Page 12 - Value from being j made Money, but Money receives its value from being made of Silver and Gold: For Money (as Money) hath no other value than Figures or Counters, by which Men keep Accounts with one another; but because Money is now become a common Pledge, it must be made of something that hath in it self...
Page 13 - ... thereby become Gold and Silver, but it becomes Money. Gold is money, and Silver is money, and yet Gold is not Silver, nor Silver Gold. Things of different Substances may be put to the same use; Brick and Stone, Brass and Copper, Lead and Iron, may be all adapted to the same Uses, being stamped into the same Forms; Therefore whatever is capable of all the Qualities of Money, is capable of being made Money.
Page 19 - Another advocate of paper money, John Asgill, denied the truth of the quantity theory of money on different and exceedingly slender grounds : an increase in money would lower the rate of interest and therefore raise land values, but not the prices of commodities in general, because "the price of corn and cattle don't rise and fall with the interest of money."98 John Law attacked it, partly by arguments closely resembling those of Potter, partly on reasoning peculiarly his own.
Page 4 - ... influenced perhaps to a greater degree than has been recognized the development of the wage fund doctrine and the accompanying theory of capital through John Stuart Mill. Barton's tract is not easily obtainable, and reissue is likely to prove useful to students of the classical doctrines. In this reprint an attempt has been made to preserve the general appearance of the title page and the arrangement of the text; the original pagination has been indicated, and a few notes have been appended....
Page 39 - John Locke, the great recoinage and the origins of the Board of Trade, 1695-1698', William and Mary Quarterly, 3rd series, 14 (1957), 370-402; JET Rogers, The first nine years of the Bank of England (Oxford, 1887); W.
Page 9 - The_ sole use of Money (as Money) is but to keep an Account of other things by; it is a Tool in Trade found out by the Policy, of Man...

Bibliographic information