John Dewey, Confucius, and Global Philosophy

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SUNY Press, Aug 2, 2004 - Philosophy - 135 pages
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Joseph Grange's beautifully written book provides a unique synthesis of two major figures of world philosophy, John Dewey and Confucius, and points the way to a global philosophy based on American and Confucian values. Grange concentrates on the major themes of experience, felt intelligence, and culture to make the connections between these two giants of Western and Eastern thought. He explains why the Chinese called Dewey "A Second Confucius," and deepens our understanding of Confucius's concepts of the way (dao) of human excellence (ren). The important dimensions of American and Chinese cultural philosophy are welded into an argument that calls for the liberation of what is finest in both traditions. The work gives a new appreciation of fundamental issues facing Chinese and American relations and brings the opportunities and dangers of globalization into focus.
 

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Contents

I
ix
II
xiii
III
22
IV
31
V
50
VI
55
VII
79
VIII
85
X
89
XI
93
XII
107
XIII
113
XIV
121
XV
129
XVI
131
Copyright

IX
86

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About the author (2004)

Joseph Grange is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Southern Maine. He is the author of The City: An Urban Cosmology and Nature: An Environmental Cosmology and the coeditor (with William Desmond) of Being and Dialectic: Metaphysics as a Cultural Presence, all published by SUNY Press.

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