John Macksoud's Other illusions: inquiries toward a rhetorical theory

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Purdue University Press, 2009 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 95 pages
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Craig Smith has provided an introduction and edition of John Macksoud's Other Illusions. This posthumous work, which was completed in 1973, reinforces a strain of relativistic theory that retrieves the Sophists and extends through Jacques Derrida to the present where many of us deal with constructed realities in our rhetorical theories. Macksoud was also offering a warning about pseudo-scientific research, a Philipic against the quantitative approach to communication theory. He not only attempted to reveal the rhetorical nature of their use of the scientific method, he tried to show that science itself was at base rhetorical. In form, the short book threatened the established order of the academic community. The book uses anecdotes, sayings, stories and even jokes to mark off sections and to initiate new lines of thought. These devices were deemed subversive rather than performative because they are rarely if ever used in academic prose and because the messages they carry undercut normal ways of thinking.

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Inside Animal Hoarding profiles one of the largest and most intriguing cases of animal hoarding in recent history. Celeste Killeen's investigation pries open the door to Barbara Erickson's hidden and closely guarded life, offering an in-depth view of animal hoarding. The chaos and torment discovered by local officials who'd responded to a ramshackle farmhouse in eastern Oregon was described as otherworldly, unbelievable. But, it was only the sad ending to a lifelong story of betrayal, abuse and abandonment. This in-depth look at how animal hoarding developed in one woman's life offers the rich detail and context so important in understanding how to recognize and respond to it and maybe even prevent it. Dr. Arnold Arluke's discussion follows the Erickson story with current research on animal hoarding and how it ties into the Erickson case. Drawing from his background in sociology and extensive study of the human/animal relationship, Arluke offers further insight about animal hoarders, how they see themselves, how society deals with them, and why people find them so perplexing. This integration of investigative journalism and scholarship offers a fresh approach with appeal to a broad audience of readers, those new to learning about the phenomenon, and those with first-hand experience in the animal welfare field.aAs editor and introducer of John Macksoud's Other Illusions, Craig R. Smith brings his vast experience in rhetorical theory and criticism to the fore. Smith was a student and colleague of Macksoud's before Smith started his own teaching career which took him San Diego State University, the University of Virginia, the University of Alabama Birmingham, and finally to California State University, Long Beach. In between these academic positions, Smith served as a full-time speechwriter to President Gerald Ford (1976) and Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca (1982). He also served as a consultant to CBS News for convention, election, and Inaurgural coverage. Currently, al

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