Johns Hopkins University Studies in Historical and Political Science

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Johns Hopkins University Press, 1892
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Page 178 - That religion or the duty which we owe to our Creator, and the manner of discharging it, can be directed only by reason and conviction, not by force or violence ; and, therefore, all men are equally entitled to the free exercise of religion, according to the dictates of conscience ; and that it is the mutual duty of all to practice Christian forbearance, love and charity towards each other.
Page 398 - In all labour there is profit: but the talk of the lips tendeth only to penury.
Page 623 - Nor can we suppress our astonishment that a British Parliament should ever consent to establish in that country a religion that has deluged your island in blood, and dispersed impiety, bigotry, persecution, murder, and rebellion through every part of the world.
Page 166 - As the happiness of a people, and the good order and preservation of civil government, essentially depend upon piety, religion, and morality; and as these cannot be generally diffused through a community but by the institution of the public worship of GOD and of public instructions in piety, religion, and morality...
Page 224 - That such as profess faith in God by Jesus Christ (though differing in judgment from the doctrine, worship or discipline publicly held forth) shall not be restrained from, but shall be protected in, the profession of the faith and the exercise of their religion...
Page 620 - That the inhabitants of the English colonies in North America, by the immutable laws of nature, the principles of the English Constitution, and the several charters or compacts, have the following rights : Resolved, NCD 1.
Page 606 - The question with me is, not whether you have a right to render your people miserable ; but whether it is not your interest to make them happy. It is not, what a lawyer tells me, I may do; but what humanity, reason, and justice, tell me, I ought to do.
Page 606 - Be content to bind America by laws of trade ; you have always done it. Let this be your reason for binding their trade. Do not burden them by taxes ; you were not used to do so from the beginning. Let this be your reason for not taxing. These are the arguments of states and kingdoms. Leave the rest to the schools ; for there only they may be discussed with safety.
Page 621 - But from the necessity of the case, and a regard to the mutual interest of both countries, we cheerfully consent, to the operation of such acts of the British parliament, as are buna fide, restrained to the regulation of our external commerce, for the purpose of securing the commercial advantages of the whole empire to the mother country, and the commercial benefits of its respective members ; excluding every idea of taxation internal or external, for raising a revenue, on the subjects in America,...
Page 441 - That no man shall, by any ways or means, in word or deed, affront or wrong any Indian but he shall incur the same penalty of the law as if he had committed it against his fellow planter...

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