Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, in Miniature: With Many Additional Words from Todd, and Other Authors; Containing Also a Collection of Phrases, from the Latin, French, Italian, and Spanish; a Selection of Scotticisms, Vulgar Anglicisms, and Grammatical Improprieties; Alphabetically Arranged; a Copious Chronological and Historical Table; and a List of Heathen Deities

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University Press, 1820 - English language - 320 pages
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Page 313 - Prome'theus, son of lapetus. who animated a man that he had formed of clay, with fire, which, by the assistance of Minerva, he...
Page 309 - A husbandman, but afterward king of Phrygia, remarkable for tying a knot of cords, on which the empire of Asia depended, in so very intricate a manner, that Alexander, unable to unravel it, cut it asunder.
Page 139 - Longitude, length; the distance of any part of the earth, east or west, from London, or any other given place...
Page 124 - INGHAFF, in-gnU'. va To propagate trees by inoculation. To INGRAFT, in-graft'. va To propagate trees by grafting ; to plant the sprig of one tree in the stock of another ; to plant any thing not native ; to fix deep, to settle. — See To GRAFF and GKAFT. INGRAFTMENT, in-graft'm^nt. s. The act of ingrafting; the sprig ingrafted. INGRATE, in-grate'.
Page 159 - A woman who has the care of another's child, or of a sick person; one who breeds, educates, or protects, v.
Page 38 - The day of the week, throughout the year, answering to the day on which the feast of the Holy Innocents is solemnized. CHILDHOOD, tshlld'hud, s.
Page 313 - He asked the guidance of his father's chariot for one day as a proof of his divine descent; but, unable to manage the horses, set the world on fire, and was therefore struck by Jupiter with a thunderbolt into the river Po.
Page 161 - ... offieium, office). To perform the duties of an office, for oneself, or on behalf of another. Officinal, of-fissy-nal (Latin, qfficina). Pertaining to a shop ; applied especially to such medicines as are kept ready for use in the shops of apothecaries. Offing, of-fing (from off). In nautical language, the open sea, or that part of it which is at a distance off the shore, and where no pilot is needed. Offscouring, off - skowring. That which is scoured off, cast off, or thrown off ; refuse, or rejected...
Page 290 - ... event followed by the most daring riots, in the city of London, and in Southwark, for several successive days, in which some Popish chapels are destroyed, together with the prisons of Newgate, the King's Bench, the Fleet, several private houses, &c. These alarming riots are at length suppressed by the interposition of the military, and many of the rioters tried and executed for felony...
Page 309 - Megsera, and Tisiphone, with hair composed of snakes, and armed with whips, chains.

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