Joint Operational Warfare: Theory and Practice

Front Cover
Government Printing Office, 2009 - Law - 1492 pages
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Smallholder farmers and pastoralists fulfil an invaluable yet undervalued role in conserving biodiversity. They act as guardians of locally adapted livestock breeds that can make use of even marginal environments under tough climatic conditions and therefore are a crucial resource for food security. But in addition, by sustaining animals on natural vegetation and as part of local ecosystems, these communities also make a significant contribution to the conservation of wild biodiversity and of cultural landscapes. This publication provides a glimpse into the often intricate knowledge systems that pastoralists and smallholder farmers have developed for the management of their breeds in specific production systems and it also describes the multitude of threats and challenges these often marginalized communities have to cope with.
 

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'Smallholder farmers and pastoralists fulfil an invaluable yet undervalued role in conserving biodiversity. They act as guardians
of locally adapted livestock breeds that can make use of even marginal environments under tough climatic conditions and therefore are a crucial resource for food security. But in addition, by sustaining animals on natural vegetation and as part of local ecosystems, these communities also make a significant contribution to the conservation of wild biodiversity and of cultural landscapes. This publication provides a glimpse into the often intricate knowledge systems that pastoralists and smallholder farmers have developed for the management of their breeds in specific production systems and it also describes the multitude of threats and challenges these often marginalized communities have to cope with.' 

Contents

On Operational Art
1-3
Military Art and Its Components
1-4
Operational Thinking XI3
1-10
Evolution of Operational Warfare 115
1-15
PolicyStrategyOperational Art Nexus 135
1-35
Desired Strategic End State and Strategic Objective 145
1-45
Military Objectives and the Levels of War II3
IR-3
Hierarchy of Military Objectives II4
IR-4
Scale of Logistical Support VIII77
215
Operational Protection VIII95
233
Operational DecisionMaking and Planning
IG-1
IX3
IG-4
Regressive Reverse Planning IX6
IG-6
Operational Commanders Estimate of the Situation and the Decision IX17
IG-17
Operational Commanders Estimate of the Situation and the Decision IX24
24
Mission Analysis IX25
25

Accomplishment of a Military Objective and Its Effects 1113
IR-13
Objectives of Land Warfare 1125
IR-25
Objectives of Naval Warfare 1145
IR-45
Sea Control 1149
IR-49
Objectives of Air Warfare 1163
IR-63
Objectives of Air Warfare 1164
IR-64
Operational Factors III3
IR-97
The Factor of Space III7
IR-98
The Factor of Time Ill19
IR-113
The Factor of Force 11133
IR-127
Combat Power vs Combat Potential 11134
IR-128
The Factors of Space Time and Force 11151
IR-145
Information and Operational Factors 11165
IR-159
The Theater and Its Structure IV3
IE-3
Land Theater Physical Features IV13
IE-13
Physical Environment in the Littorals IV35
IE-35
Theater Geometry IV49
IE-49
Central vs Exterior Position IV52
IE-52
Maritime Bases of Operations IV59
IE-59
Main and Secondary Lines of Operation IV65
IE-65
Lines of Communications LOCs IV73
IE-73
Methods of Combat Force Employment
V-3
On Operations Vl 1
V-11
Henry H E Lloyds Concept of Line of Operation V12
V-12
Major Operations V33
V-19
General Genrykh Leers Concept of the Main Operation V20
V-20
Soviet View of Operations Late 1980s V26
V-26
A Major Operation and Its Elements V36
V-36
Major Land Operations V39
V-39
Major Air Operations V63
V-63
Major Naval Operations V75
V-75
Major Naval Operation and Its Main Elements V89
V-89
Majoi JointCombined Operations V97
V-97
Air Missions In Support of Ground Forces in U S Terms V102
V-102
MATOR PHASES OF COMBAT FORCES EMPLOYMENT
VE-3
Major Phases of Combat Forces Employment
VE-6
Operational Concentration VII5
5
Major Phases Elements of Combat Force Employment VII3
8
Concept of Critical Factors and Center of Gravity VII13
13
Concept of Critical Factors and Center of Gravity VII15
15
Shift in a Center of Gravity in
24
Misconceptions on Center of Gravity VII29
37
The German Concept of Schwerpunkt VII39
39
Schwerpunkt within a Schwerpunkt Concept VII43
43
Operational Maneuver VII53
53
Operational Maneuver Part 1 VII55
55
Operational Maneuver Part 2 VII56
56
Concept of the Culmination Point VII73
73
Theory of Culminating Point VII74
74
Attackers Point of Culmination VII76
76
Defenders Point of Culmination VII79
79
Culminating Point and the Levels of War VII80
80
OperationalStrategic Deception VII97
97
Scale of Deception Effort VII99
99
Operational Reserves VII121
121
Operational Functions
139
Operational Functions in Generic Terms VIII3
141
Operational Command Organization VIII7
145
Operational Intelligence VIII25
163
Scale of Intelligence VIII27
165
Operational Command and Control Warfare VIII45
183
Operational Fires VIII60
198
Operational Logistics VIII75
213
Process of Restating the Mission IX28
28
Process of Converting Essential Tasks into Restated Purpose IX30
30
Commanders Intent IX31
31
Planning Assumptions IX33
33
The Situation IX37
37
Estimate of the Situation IX38
38
CapabilitiesCourseofAction Development Logic IX43
43
Operational Commander vs FunctionalService Component IX45
45
Operational Planning IX63
63
Campaign Phases in Generic Terms IX70
70
Major Combat Phase IX83
83
Design for a Major Operation IX84
84
Relationship Between the Strategic Objective and Desired Strategic End State Strategic Effect IX85
85
Process of Determining Center of Gravity IX91
91
DirectionAxis IX95
95
The Operational Idea IX103
103
Operational Idea IX107
107
Methods of DefeatingNeutralizing the Enemys Center of Gravity IX109
109
Sectors of Effort in Land Warfare IX114
114
Branches and Sequels Concept IX122
122
Operational Phasing Concept IX123
123
Operational Sequencing IX135
135
ObjectiveOriented Method IX137
137
TaskOriented Method IX139
139
Operational Synchronization IX145
145
Synchronization Dynamics IX149
149
Deployment Planning IX157
157
Deception Planning IX163
163
War Termination Planning IX173
173
War Termination Dynamics IX176
176
Operational Design for War Termination IX186
186
Operational Leadership
X-1
On Leadership
X-3
Operational Command and Control X19
X-19
Tenets of Operational Leadership X47
X-47
The Decisions X61
X-61
Decisions and the Level of War X66
X-66
Exercising Operational Leadership X75
X-75
Operational Education
XG-1
Acquiring Operational Thinking XI7
XG-7
Operational Thinkers and Practitioners XI19
XG-19
Operational Vision XI35
XG-25
Operational Thinking vs Operational Vision XI37
XG-37
Operational Lessons Learned XI43
XG-43
Problems of Common Terminology XI81
XG-81
Logical Lines of Operation XI84
XG-84
On Doctrine XII3
XG-97
Operational Art and Doctrine XII27
XG-121
Operational vs Tactical Concept XII34
XG-128
Its Promises and Problems XIII3
XG-135
SelfSynchronization XIII10
XG-142
NetworkCentric Warfare and the Art of War XIII15
XG-147
Domains of Conflict versus the Art of War XIII25
XG-157
General J F C Fullers Concept of Domains Spheres of War XIII26
XG-158
Smaller vs Larger Forces XIII33
XG-165
NetworkCentric Warfare and the Vision of the Future War XIII43
XG-175
Systems Approach to Center of Gravity XIII53
XG-185
Col John Wardens FiveRing Model XIII55
XG-187
EffectsBased Warfare and Operational Art XIII65
XG-197
The Process XIII68
XG-200
The Future of Operational Warfare XIV3
3
A School
29

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