Jokes and Their Relation to Society

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Walter de Gruyter, 1998 - Social Science - 234 pages
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A comparative and historical study of jokes and other forms of humor, addressing topics such as: local, regional, and ethnic jokes about stupidity; the Protestant ethic and the comic spirit of capitalism; ethnic jokes about alcohol--a study of the humor of ambivalence; and making fun of work--humor as sociology in the humorous writings of H.G. Wells. The author looks at several levels of explanation and concludes that although none provide a full account of joking, taken together they give insight into joking patterns. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
 

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Contents

Chapter
1
List of tables
2
Chapter 3
27
Chapter 4
43
Chapter 5
63
Chapter 6
85
Chapter 7
101
Ethnic jokes about stupidity and alcohol
108
Nasty legends sick humour and ethnic jokes about stupidity
137
Chapter 9
151
Conclusion
165
Opposed sets of ethnic jokes
188
Notes
193
Irish and Polish jokes about drinking
201
Index
229
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About the author (1998)

Christie Davies is professor of sociology at the University of Reading, England, where he teaches the sociology of morality & a master's course unit on Death & the State.

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