Virtual Culture: Identity and Communication in Cybersociety

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Steve Jones
SAGE, May 20, 1997 - Computers - 262 pages
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Virtual Culture marks a significant intervention in the current debate about access and control in cybersociety exposing the ways in which the Internet and other computer-mediated communication technologies are being used by disadvantaged and marginal groups - such as gay men, women, fan communities and the homeless - for social and political change.

The contributors to this book apply a range of theoretical perspecitves derived from communication studies, sociology and anthropology to demonstrate the theoretical and practical possibilities for cybersociety as an identity-structured space.

 

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Contents

The Internet and its Social Landscape
7
Virtual
36
Looking for India on
55
Structural Relations Electronic Media and Social
80
A Case
102
The Discursive
185
Correctional Strategies
206
Civil Society Political Economy and the Internet
236
Index
258
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About the author (1997)

Steve Jones is professor and head of the Department of Communication at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is author/editor of numerous books, including Doing Internet Research, The Encyclopedia of New Media, CyberSociety, and Virtual Culture. He is co-founder and president of the Association of Internet Researchers and co-editor of New Media & Society, an international journal of research on new media, technology, and culture. He also edits New Media Cultures, a series of books on culture and technology for Sage Publications, and Digital Formations, a series of books on new media for Peter Lang Publishers.

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