Joshua 1-12: A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary

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Yale University Press, Aug 25, 2015 - Religion - 656 pages
An acknowledged expert on the Hebrew Bible, Thomas Dozeman offers a fresh translation of the Hebrew and Greek texts of the book of Joshua and explores the nature, function, and causes of the religious violence depicted therein. By blending the distinct teachings of Deuteronomy and the Priestly literature, Dozeman provides a unique interpretation of holy war as a form of sacred genocide, arguing that, since peace in the promised land required the elimination of the populations of all existent royal cities, a general purging of the land accompanied the progress of the ark of the covenant. This essential work of religious scholarship demonstrates how the theme of total genocide is reinterpreted as partial conquest when redactors place Joshua, an independent book, between Deuteronomy and Judges. The author traces the evolution of this reinterpretation of the central themes of religious violence while providing a comparison of the two textual versions of Joshua and an insightful analysis of the book’s reception history.
 

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Contents

BIBLIOGRAPHY
95
TRANSLATION
165
NOTES AND COMMENTS
185
118
187
124
223
1512
250
13627
302
126
339
143
424
123
459
124
482
Translation of the MT and the LXX
501
Geographical Terms in the MT and LXX
535
General Index
557
Index of Authors
567
Index of Ancient Sources
577

135
362
127
397

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About the author (2015)

Thomas Dozeman is Professor of Old Testament at United Thelogical Seminary in Dayton, Ohio.

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