Journal of a Tour in the Highlands and Western Islands of Scotland in 1800

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1903 - Hebrides (Scotland) - 318 pages
 

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Page 289 - Quench'd is his lamp of varied lore, That loved the light of song to pour ; A distant and a deadly shore Has LEYDEN'S cold remains ! XII.
Page 138 - Be thou near, to learn the song; future times shall hear of me ! The sons of the feeble hereafter will lift the voice on Cona ; and, looking up to the rocks, say, 'Here Ossian dwelt'.
Page v - The Editor dismisses this volume from his hands with mingled pleasure and regret ; pleasure, from the recollection of several agreeable hours spent in its arrangement, during the intervals of severer study ; and regret at bidding adieu to the investigation of Scotish literary 'antiquities, a subject which he can never expect to resume.
Page 138 - The sons of the feeble hereafter will lift the voice on Cona ; and, looking up to the rocks, say, 'Here Ossian dwelt'. They shall admire the chiefs of old, the race that are no more ! while we ride on our clouds, Malvina ! on the wings of the roaring winds. Our voices shall be heard, at times, in the desert ; we shall sing on the breeze of the rock.
Page ix - It is remarkable, that after long and painful research in quest of original passages of the poems of Ossian, he adopted an opinion more favourable to their authenticity than has lately prevailed in the literary world. But the confessed infidelity of Macpherson must always excite the strongest suspicion on this subject. Leyden composed, with his usual facility, several detached poems upon highland traditions, all of which have probably perished, excepting a ballad, founded upon the romantic legend...
Page 138 - Cona ; let me think on the days of other years. And bring me the harp, O maid ! that I may touch it, when the light of my soul shall arise. Be thou near, to learn the song; future times shall hear of me ! The sons of the feeble hereafter will lift the voice on Cona ; and, looking up to the rocks, say, 'Here...
Page 285 - ... lakes/ and rapid torrents, over which the thunders and lightnings, and tempests, and rains, of heaven, exhaust their terrific rage, wrought upon the creative powers of the imagination, and from these appearances, the Highlanders " were naturally led to ascribe every disaster to the influence of superior powers, in whose character the predominating feature necessarily was malignity towards the human race.
Page 287 - A Companion and Useful Guide to the Beauties of Scotland, to the Lakes of Westmorland, Cumberland, and Lancashire; and to the Curiosities in the District of Craven, in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
Page 310 - Russell (Dr.) — The Life of Cardinal Mezzofanti : With an Introductory Memoir of eminent Linguists, Ancient and Modern. By CW RUSSELL, DD, President of St. Patrick's College, Maynooth. With Portrait and Facsimiles. 8vo. 12s. The Saints our Example. By the Author of Letters to my Unknown Friendt, &c. Fcp. 8vo. price 7s. Scherzer.— Travels in the Free States of Central America : Nicaragua, Honduras, and San Salvador.
Page ix - Corrievrekin, inscribed' to Lady Charlotte Campbell, and published in the third volume of the Border Minstrelsy, which appeared at the distance of about a twelvemonth after the two first volumes of that work.1 The opening of this ballad exhibits a power of numbers, •which, for the mere melody of sound, has seldom been excelled in English poetry.

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