Judicial Remedies in International Law

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Clarendon Press, 1990 - History - 250 pages
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The first comprehensive study of judicial remedies in international law, this book begins with a close examination of the early development of judicial remedies through the varied practice of international arbitral tribunals. Gray then goes on to evaluate the significance of the contributions made by the Permanent Court of International Justice, its successor the International Court of Justice, and specialized tribunals such as the European and American courts of human rights and the United Nations administrative tribunal. The author finally considers whether recent international commercial arbitration offers a new approach to the question of judicial remedies.
 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
Remedies in the World Court
59
A Comparison of Judicial Remedies in the European Com
120
Special Tribunals
149
National Claims Commissions The IranUnited States
178
Scope and Future Development of Judicial Remedies
210
Bibliography
239
Index
249
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About the author (1990)

Christine D. Gray is at St Hilda's College.

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