Judicial Review and the Law of the Constitution

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Yale University Press, 1990 - Law - 228 pages
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In this book, the author presents a new interpretation of the origin of judicial review. She traces the development of judicial review from American independence through the tenure of John Marshall as Chief Justice, showing that Marshall's role was far more innovative and decisive than has yet been recognized. According to the author all support for judicial review before Marshall contemplated a fundamentally different practice from that which we know today. Marshall did not simply reinforce or extend ideas already accepted but, in superficially minor and disguised ways, effected a radical transformation in the nature of the constitution and the judicial relationship to it.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER
1
CHAPTER
13
CHAPTER THREE
45
CHAPTER FOUR
90
CHAPTER FIVE
109
CHAPTER
176
CHAPTER SEVEN
195
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