Judicial Review in the Commonwealth Caribbean

Front Cover
Routledge, Jan 11, 2013 - Law - 344 pages
0 Reviews

The establishment of the Caribbean Court of Justice sees the countries of the Commonwealth Caribbean at an important and exciting judicial crossroads. Debate, often acrimonious, continues over the abolishment of ties to the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and, increasingly those influencing the debate are a more educated and articulate Caribbean people, insisting on proper governance of the area's public bodies. This new book analyzes judicial review, a mechanism for achieving public justice, through emerging case law in the hope that it will cast light on the jurisprudential evolution of Caribbean society in the twenty-first century.

Bringing together cases and materials on judicial review in the Caribbean for the first time, this book examines what judicial review is, before going on to discuss the grounds, obstacles and conduct within the judicial review process. It concludes by examining the future of judicial review and justice more generally in the Caribbean.

Legal professionals in the Caribbean will find it a useful and comprehensive reference tool.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

AN INTRODUCTION
1
2 GROUNDS FOR JUDICIAL REVIEW
19
3 NATURAL JUSTICE
115
4 OBSTACLES TO A JUDICIAL DETERMINATION OF THE MERITS OF A JUDICIAL REVIEW APPLICATION
151
5 CONDUCT OF JUDICIAL REVIEW PROCEEDINGS
231
6 REMEDIES
245
7 BREAKING NEW GROUNDS
261
JUSTICE IN THE FUTURE
281
TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
283
JAMAICA
293
BARBADOS
300
INDEX
305
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Rajendra Ramlogan obtained his B.A. in English Literature from the University of the West Indies, Trinidad. He graduated with an LLB from the University of the West Indies, Barbados, and an LLM (International Legal Studies) from New York University School of Law. Dr. Ramlogan received his PhD in International Environmental Law from the University of Cambridge and is currently a Law Lecturer in the Department of Management Studies at the University of the West Indies, Trinidad.

Bibliographic information