Judiciaries in Comparative Perspective

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H. P. Lee
Cambridge University Press, Aug 11, 2011 - Law
An independent and impartial judiciary is fundamental to the existence and operation of a liberal democracy. Focussing on Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States, this comparative 2011 study explores four major issues affecting the judicial institution. These issues relate to the appointment and discipline of judges; judges and freedom of speech; the performance of non-judicial functions by judges; and judicial bias and recusal, and each is set within the context of the importance of maintaining public confidence in the judiciary. The essays highlight important episodes or controversies affecting members of the judiciary to illustrate relevant principles.
 

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Contents

PART I I I
151
PART IV
277
PART V
401
PART VI
531
INDEX
542
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Hoong Phun ('H. P.') Lee holds the Sir John Latham Chair of Law at Monash University and was the Vice-Chairman of the Australian Press Council from 1994 to 2010. He was appointed an Adjunct Professor of Law, City University of Hong Kong in 2009. His areas of teaching and research interests include the judiciary, comparative constitutional law, administrative law and the Malaysian and Singaporean constitutional systems.

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