Julius Caesar

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Doubleday, Page, 1912 - 239 pages
 

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it is truly heart touching.................................................the best books in the world

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I thought this book was interesting...if you have a low attention span though DONT read it!!!

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Page 29 - Would he were fatter: — But I fear him not. Yet if my name were liable to fear, I do not know the man I should avoid So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much ; He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men...
Page 23 - To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves, that we are underlings. Brutus, and Caesar: what should be in that Caesar...
Page 21 - Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in, And bade him follow : so, indeed, he did. The torrent roar'd ; and we did buffet it With lusty sinews ; throwing it aside, And stemming it with hearts of controversy. But ere we could arrive the point propos'd, Caesar cried,
Page 25 - Now, in the names of all the gods at once, Upon what meat doth this our Caesar feed, That he is grown so great? Age, thou art sham'd!
Page 169 - Fret till your proud heart break ; Go show your slaves how choleric you are, And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge ? Must I observe you? Must I stand and crouch Under your testy humor?
Page 43 - And, yesterday, the bird of night did sit, Even at noon-day, upon the market-place, Hooting and shrieking.' When these prodigies Do so conjointly meet, let not men say ' These are their reasons, — They are natural;' For, I believe, they are portentous things Unto the climate that they point upon.
Page 87 - Cowards die many times before their deaths ; The valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, It...
Page 175 - I could weep My spirit from mine eyes ! There is my dagger, And here my naked breast ; within, a heart Dearer than Plutus' mine, richer than gold ; If that thou be'st a Roman, take it forth ; I, that denied thee gold, will give my heart ; Strike, as thou didst at Caesar ; for I know, When thou didst hate him worst, thou lovedst him better Than ever thou lovedst Cassius.
Page 147 - Cassius' dagger through : See what a rent the envious Casca made: Through this the well-beloved Brutus stabb'd; And as he pluck'd his cursed steel away, Mark how the blood of Caesar...
Page 147 - O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what! weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd as you see, with traitors.

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