For the seventh grade

Front Cover
Ginn and Company, 1921 - English language
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Contents

Testing Yourselves in Avoiding Runon Sentences
34
Discovering Amputated Parts of Sentences
35
Correcting Errors in Writing Amputated Members of Sentences as Sentences Copying
36
Seeing that Every Sentence Is Either Declarative or Interrogative
37
Marking Declarative and Interrogative Sentences Cor rectly Copying
38
Summing up What You Have Learned of Sentences
39
CULTIVATING GOOD HABITS OF WORKING AT COMPOSITIONS 1 Reviewing What You Have Learned about Preparing a Story to Tell
40
Seeing the Need of Good Form in Written Work
41
Making a Revision Guide for Good Form
45
Correcting a Story by Your Revision Guide
46
Practicing Prevision and Revision Test Theme
48
TELLING THE NEWS IN A LETTER 1 Seeing Why a Letter Is Interesting
50
Copying an Interesting Letter Copying and Dictation
52
Planning and Writing an Interesting Letter
54
Criticizing Imperfect Letter Form
59
Testing the Class for Perfect Letter Form
63
Clearly
64
Testing the Clearness of Directions
65
Noting the Effect of Definite and of Indefinite Names
67
Finding Clear Explanations as Models
68
Studying a Clear Explanation Copying Optional
70
Writing Clear Explanations
71
Summing Up What You Have Learned about Nouns and Pronouns
72
CHOOSING DETAILS FOR A PURPOSE
74
Showing the Purpose of Some Paragraphs
75
Choosing according to a Real Purpose
76
Criticizing the Choice of Details for the Purpose of Giving a Definite Picture
78
Picturing with Details Well Chosen for a Purpose
80
Studying and Memorizing a Poets Picture Full of Well Chosen Details
82
Finding Sentence Ends in Copying a Description Full of WellChosen Details Copying
85
DESCRIBING ACCURATELY
87
Illustrating the Value of Accuracy
88
Seeing the Value of Accurate Observations for Accurate Reports Copying
89
Testing Keenness of Observation
90
Finding Characteristics with All the Senses
94
PREDICATING 1 Understanding the Meaning of Predicate
96
Seeing What Circumstances Make You Notice Different Characteristics of a Thing
100
exercise page 3 Thinking of Many Characteristics of a Person or Thing ioi 4 Predicating Characteristics
101
Noticing and Predicating Different Characteristics
103
Predicating Actions
104
Finding the Characteristics Expressed in Sentences
107
Finding and Imagining the Characteristic Predicated
109
ANALYZING THEM TO FIND THEIR ELEMENTS
111
The Subject Element 112 2 Studying Sentences Two Elements of the Simplest Predicate
113
The Predicate Element
115
Finding Subject and Predicate Elements
116
BEGINNING WELL
118
The Linking or Asserting Element in Easy Sentences
131
Finding the Sentence Elements in Sentences of Differ ent Patterns
133
Telling a Story Vividly and Keeping the Time Straight
136
SUMMING UP WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED ABOUT THE SENTENCE exercise page 1 Reviewing Sentences
138
Making Easy Sentences Picturing a Person and Finding Their Elements
141
Summarizing Facts about the Sentence
143
STICKING TO THE POINT 1 Finding the Point of a Paragraph
145
Making a Single Point
146
Recognizing the Verb
148
Classifying Verbs
150
Sticking to the Point
151
REVIEWING 1 Summing Up What You Have Learned This Term
154
Finding the Essential Elements in Connected Sentences and Classifying Verbs
155
Reviewing Nouns and Pronouns
156
Supplying Capitals and Punctuation in a Letter and Writing It from Dictation
157
Reviewing Spelling
158
REPORTING ACCURATELY 1 Using Words Accurately
161
Seeing Important Likenesses and Differences Copying or Dictation
163
Reading Accurately and Reporting Accurately What You Read
164
Seeing an Important Differ ence in Kinds of Action
166
Distinguishing Two Kinds of Verbs
169
Distinguishing the Object
170
Reporting Accurately on Postal Regulations
172
YOUR REGION BY WELLPLANNED LETTERS
174
Comparing a Good Mail Order and a Poor One
182
Finding Predicate Elements
189
Planning andOutlining a Class Paper 268
208
Editing and Proofreading
218
REPORTING ON AN INTERESTING BOOK
222
IMPROVING EVERYDAY CONVERSATION
233
Pronouncing Troublesome Verbals
240
Applying Rules for Writing Conversation
248
DRAMATIZING A STORY OR A SCENE
257
Practicing Affirmative and Negative Sentences
263
Illustrating Coordination
269
exercise page
273
MASTER
280
Studying the Parts of Verbs and the Tense Phrases
286
REVIEWING
292
APPENDIX A A Speech Gauge
299
Capitalization Punctuation and Spelling
306
LetterWriting
323
APPENDIX E Grammar
329
APPENDIX F Outline and Paragraphs
381
APPENDIX G Larger Problems for Individual or Group
390
INDEX
397

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 294 - it to mean — neither more nor less the question is said alice whether you can make words mean so many different things the question is said humpty dumpty which is to be master — thats all
Page 206 - the saving, dear to the wasteful. He that hath a trade hath an estate. Experience keeps a dear school, yet fools will learn in no other. Plough deep while sluggards sleep, And you shall have corn to sell and to keep. A wise man will desire no more than he can get justly, use soberly, distribute cheerfully, and leave contentedly.
Page 206 - A reproof entereth more into a wise man than a hundred stripes into a fool. There is that maketh himself rich, yet hath nothing; there is that maketh himself poor, yet hath great riches. Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom ; and with all thy getting get understanding. — Proverbs The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
Page 295 - a great deal to make one word mean alice said in a thoughtful tone when i make a word do a lot of work like that said humpty dumpty i always pay it extra oh said alice she was too much puzzled to make any other remark.
Page 315 - NOTE 4. Do you see any connection between Rule B and the spelling and pronunciation of such words as starred, stared; scarring, scared; fury,furry; cured, occurred; referring, interfering. C. " Ei " OR " IE " ? / before e, Except after c, Or when sounded as a, As in neighbor and weigh. 1.
Page 294 - all alice was too much puzzled to say anything so after a minute humpty dumpty began again theyve a temper, some of them — particularly verbs theyre the proudest adjectives you can do anything with but not verbs however i can manage the whole lot of them impenetrability
Page 85 - it was a bright enough little place of entertainment the sign was newly painted the windows had neat red curtains the floor was cleanly sanded there was a street on each side, and an open door on both, which made the large, low room pretty clear to see in, in spite of clouds of tobacco smoke.
Page 294 - find them suggestive. i dont know what you mean by glory alice said humpty dumpty smiled contemptuously of course you dont till i tell you i meant
Page 242 - house all is still; nothing human is visible but a curly black head leaning on a thin hand at the upper window. Jo. (To herself} There he is, poor boy! all alone and sick this dismal day. It's a shame! I '11 toss up a snowball, and make him look out, and then say a kind word to him.
Page 179 - speak every word as beautifully as you can. THE LAW OF KINDNESS The Good American is Kind. In America those who are of different races, colors, and conditions must live together. We are of many different sorts, but we are one great people. Every unkindness hurts the common life; every kindness helps the common life. Therefore:

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