Just Tell Them I Survived!: Women in Antarctica

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Allen & Unwin, 2001 - Travel - 248 pages
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This collection of interviews celebrates women's participation in national and private expeditions to Antarctica. Based on 130 interviews the book ranges across the first women scientists to visit Macquarie Island in 1959, to contemporary 'winterers'. Given the extent to which men have traditionally marked out the territory, physically, socially and psychologically, how do women experience an Antarctic stay, what attracts them to remote places, and how do they depict the stunning beauty of Antarctica itself. Who are they, how do they speak of their work and their experiences, and what are the effects on their lives of working in Antarctica?

Robin Burns has not only talked to women from many different backgrounds in order to answer such questions, but has also been a summer expeditioner herself to gain authentic experience of her subject. The result is a comprehensive account of women in Antarctic expeditions. She discovers the deep-seated longings of women to join these expeditions, the barriers they have to overcome, the good times and the bad, and the ways they would like their experiences and reflections to be passed on to others.
 

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Contents

I want to go too
1
1 Finally we were on our way Women become Antarctic expeditioners
11
2 I had this dream
31
3 I just wanted to do my job well
52
4 Everything you do is noticed there
78
5 If you pat one pat them all
102
6 Tell them I survived
132
7 It just blew my mind away
161
8 Theres no room for heroes there
180
Appendix 1 Women participating in this study and theri Antarctic service
206
Appendix 2 Demographic portrait of the women compiled in August 1999
212
Appendix 3 Womens writings about Antarctica
215
Notes
219
Back cover
233
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About the author (2001)

This collection of interviews celebrates women's participation in national and private expeditions to Antarctica. Based on 130 interviews the book ranges across the first women scientists to visit Macquarie Island in 1959, to contemporary 'winterers'. Given the extent to which men have traditionally marked out the territory, physically, socially and psychologically, how do women experience an Antarctic stay, what attracts them to remote places, and how do they depict the stunning beauty of Antarctica itself. Who are they, how do they speak of their work and their experiences, and what are the effects on their lives of working in Antarctica?

Robin Burns has not only talked to women from many different backgrounds in order to answer such questions, but has also been a summer expeditioner herself to gain authentic experience of her subject. The result is a comprehensive account of women in Antarctic expeditions. She discovers the deep-seated longings of women to join these expe

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