Justice at War: The Story of the Japanese-American Internment Cases

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University of California Press, Jun 10, 1993 - History - 415 pages
Justice at War irrevocably alters the reader's perception of one of the most disturbing events in U.S. history—the internment during World War II of American citizens of Japanese descent. Peter Irons' exhaustive research has uncovered a government campaign of suppression, alteration, and destruction of crucial evidence that could have persuaded the Supreme Court to strike down the internment order. Irons documents the debates that took place before the internment order and the legal response during and after the internment.
 

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Contents

Lets Not Get Rattled
3
An American Citizen Is an American Citizen
25
Be As Reasonable As You Can
48
Am I an American or Not?
75
We Dont Intend to Trim Our Sails
104
We Could Have You Inducted
135
These Cases Should Be Dismissed
163
The Suppression of Evidence
186
No Longer Any Military Necessity 25
253
The Printing Stopped at About Noon
278
The Court Has Blown Up
311
Watergate Hadnt Happened Yet
347
This Was the Case of a Lifetime
368
Sources
377
Notes
381
Index
409

Something Worthy of the Torah 279
219

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About the author (1993)

Peter Irons is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Earl Warren Bill of Rights Project at the University of California, San Diego, and the author of The Courage of Their Convictions: Sixteen Americans Who Fought Their Way to the Supreme Court (1988).

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