Justice, liability, and blame: community views and the criminal law

Front Cover
Westview Press, Mar 29, 1995 - Law - 307 pages
0 Reviews
Drafters of legal codes often implicitly or explicitly seek to incorporate community standards. To what extent have they succeeded? This book examines shared intuitive notions of justice among laypersons and compares the discovered principles to those intantiated in current American criminal codes. After discussion of the proper role of community views in formulating legal doctrine, Robinson and Darley report eighteen original studies on a wide range of issues in dispute among legal theorists. The authors compare lay institutions and code provisions on such questions as the justified use of force, insanity, causation, complicity, risk-creation, omission liability, culpability requirements, duress, entrapment, multiple offenses, and criminalization matters such as felony murder and sexual offenses. Many important differences between the legal code and community views are found, and the authors discuss the implications of thosedifferences. One implication is the possibility that such conflicts could lead to reduced compliance as the code loses its moral authority with the community.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Community Standards and the Criminal Law
1
What Conduct Should Be Criminal?
13
When Should It Be Lawful for One
53
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1995)

John M. Darley is Dorman T. Warren Professor of Psychology at Princeton University.

Bibliographic information