Karamzin's Memoir on Ancient and Modern Russia: A Translation and Analysis

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University of Michigan Press, 2005 - History - 266 pages
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Russian history was typically studied through liberal or socialist lenses until Richard Pipes first published his translation of Karamzin's Memoir. Almost fifty years later, it is still the only English-language edition of this classic work. Still fresh and readable today, the Memoir-in which Alexander I's state historian elaborates his arguments for a strong Russian state-remains the most accessible introduction to the conservatism of Russia's ancien regime. This annotated translation is a "faithful rendition of the letter and spirit of the original," which not only introduces readers to the sweep of Karamzin's ideas, but also weaves together a fascinating version of Russia's rich history. With a new foreword by Richard Pipes, Karamzin's Memoir on Ancient and Modern Russia is a touchstone for anyone interested in Russia's fascinating and turbulent past.

Richard Pipes is Baird Professor of History at Harvard University.

Nikolai M. Karamzin (1766-1826) was a Russian historian, poet, and journalist. He was appointed court historian by Tsar Alexander I.

 

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Contents

THE BACKGROUND AND GROWTH OF KARAMZINS POLIT
3
THE HISTORY OF THE TEXT
93
A MEMOIR ON ANCIENT AND MODERN
101
The Emergence of Moscow
107
The Time of Troubles
113
Peter I
120
Anne
127
Paul I
135
Political Institutions
147
Serfdom and the Problem of Emancipation
162
Codification of Russian Law
182
RECOMMENDATIONS
190
j The Role of the Gentry in the Russian System
200
NOTES AND COMMENTS
209
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
255
Index
261

Foreign Policy
141

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About the author (2005)

Richard Pipes, Baird Research Professor of History at Harvard University, is the author of numerous books and essays. In 1981-82 he served as President Reagan's National Security Council adviser on Soviet and East European affairs. He has twice received a Guggenheim Fellowship. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Chesham, New Hampshire.

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