Architecture Goes Wild

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010 Publishers, 2002 - Architects - 253 pages
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Page 54 - Architecture is the masterly, correct and magnificent play of masses brought together in light.
Page 65 - Trans-ports v3.0, 1999 | dynamic space-frame construction must reposition its joints by lengthening or shortening the hydraulic members. The whole construction becomes active, like a bundle of muscles. Sending the pulses and addressing them to the specific cylinders means programming the structure. Trans-ports is the first example of a fully programmable building. We can program Trans-ports to take any shape within its predefined bandwidth. And at the same time we can program both the interior and...
Page 152 - ... and cone as the basic elements of architecture. That resolution is much too low. Our computers allow us to command millions of coordinates describing far more complex geometries. The form gene underlying the saltwater pavilion's shape is an octagonal, faceted ellipse which gradually transmogrifies into a quadrilateral along a three-dimensional curved path. Along that path the volume is first pumped up and then deflated again to form the sharply cut nose. The body juts out a whopping 12 metres...
Page 40 - ... transformation. ln that process there's a moment when the information is carried by a vehicle. When, for example, we drive a car, the car carries the luggage and the driver, both of which carry information. At the same time the driver carries information that he/she has stored as well as information that he/she processes in real time. The information produced during the process of driving a car consists of signals sent out by the car to other vehicles: speed, direction, indicator, brake light,...
Page 57 - ... dataflow in what for the architectural profession was a completely new but affordable manner. This is how it works. First we pick up radio signals from a buoy at sea, and use these signals as raw data input. Then these signals are read in real time by a computer program (Max) and transcribed into midi signals. Still in real time the midi signals are sent to two separate mixing tables, one dedicated to the programming of the lights and one for the sound control. The dimmable Robocolor lights are...
Page 58 - ParaSite2' we established a real time dataflow resulting in always changing and hence unpredictable environmental conditions. Being inside these architectural bodies feels like experiencing changes in the weather. It is all over you. You find yourself immersed in a dynamic environment, and it is not you who controls it. These environments are basically out of control, they have a will of their own. Now imagine you might want to interfere with these out of control environments.
Page 54 - Architecture is the programmable hyperbody played skillfully by its masters with the speed of light". LeCorbusier gave shape and meaning to architecture in the era of the Industrial Revolution. Let's now process hyperreality for the Digital Revolution. Let me be clear from the very first paragraph: virtual reality is in all respects more real than so-called reality. Virtual reality, including all software ever written for any platform, is hyperreal. Simply because we know the stuff it is made of....
Page 65 - Trans-ports is the aforementioned mental switch. Game, set and match Architecture becomes a game being played by its users. And not only architecture will be subject to the forces of real time calculation.
Page 57 - This attitude positiones the architect right in the middle of the actuality of today's society, where multimedia are quickly becoming a dominant economic factor. Working on the commission for the Saltwaterpavilion l decided that a real time connection to a continuous dataflow was essential. l proposed and realized the real time dataflow in a for the profession of architecture completely new, but affordable manner.
Page 153 - Then it is scrutinized by the public who, merely by looking at it and experiencing it, form an image of their own, strictly personal, laws and rules. And because of this self-sufficiency of form as interpreted by the independent observer, the...

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