Katrina's Imprint: Race and Vulnerability in America

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Keith Wailoo, Karen M. O'Neill, Jeffrey Dowd, Roland Anglin
Rutgers University Press, Jun 23, 2010 - Political Science - 224 pages
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Katrina's Imprint highlights the power of this sentinel American event and its continuing reverberations in contemporary politics, culture, and public policy. Published on the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, the multidisciplinary volume reflects on how history, location, access to transportation, health care, and social position feed resilience, recovery, and prospects for the future of New Orleans and the Gulf region. Essays examine the intersecting vulnerabilities that gave rise to the disaster, explore the cultural and psychic legacies of the storm, reveal how the process of rebuilding and starting over replicates past vulnerabilities, and analyze Katrina's imprint alongside American's myths of self-sufficiency. A case study of new weaknesses that have emerged in our era, this book offers an argument for why we cannot wait for the next disaster before we apply the lessons that should be learned from Katrina.
 

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Contents

PART
7
Transportation and Discrimination
21
Dialysis Patients Technological
34
Framing an Understanding
45
PART
57
Jazz Funerals Katrina
69
The Psychological
78
PART THREE
115
Private and Public
135
The Labor Market Impact of Natural Disasters
154
Dislocation and the Reproduction
169
PART FOUR
181
Race Vulnerability and Recovery
192
Index
201
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About the author (2010)

KEITH WAILOO is the Martin Luther King Jr. Professor of History at Rutgers University, and the author and editor of several books, among them Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health.

KAREN M. O'NEILL is a sociologist and associate professor of human ecology at Rutgers University, and the author of Rivers by Design: State Power and the Origins of U.S. Flood Control.

JEFFREY DOWD is a Ph.D. candidate in the sociology department at Rutgers University.

ROLAND V. ANGLIN is the director of the Initiative for Regional and Community Transformation (IRCT) at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers University.

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